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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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only a matter of time

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cool high-res star pic
www.newscientist.com/d...

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you never see anything like that going up cavehill ffs

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Too much light pollution unfortunately

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mind boggling number of stars in that image. a tiny fraction of them too. *brain melt*

Something else which I had never really grasped until recently... Comets themselves aren't really that big, but their coma (the atmosphere around them) is huge! I only really grasped how massive the coma is when I saw this image giving a scale comparison the Earth superimposed beside comet ISON... akkischitt.com/stuff/s...

Baring in mind that the solid part comet ISON itself is only about 2km wide. They are MASSIVE structures flying through space.

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Probably one of the most interesting space ISS experiment videos I've seen...

The part were the water droplet goes into orbit around the charged knitting needle is amazing!

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Launching next week...

"Gaia is an ambitious mission to chart a three-dimensional map of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, in the process revealing the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will provide unprecedented positional and radial velocity measurements with the accuracies needed to produce a stereoscopic and kinematic census of about one billion stars in our Galaxy and throughout the Local Group. This amounts to about 1 per cent of the Galactic stellar population."

ci.esa.int/gaia

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Bit more on Gaia here - www.newscientist.com/a...

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Takki, any good sites you'd recommend or RSS feeds for this type of stuff?

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Yeah, a few that I have in my RSS reader...

ysicsbuzz.physicscentr...
ys.org
www.slate.com/blogs/ba...
cienceblogs.com/starts...
www.universetoday.com

You got all the other, more mainstream, places too, like Discovery News etc

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this is pretty cool - imgur.com/a/CvEvO

the images on the voyager spacecraft, likely to survive a billion years.

fascinating to imagine an intelligent species discovering it.

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Chinese moon landing.

english.cntv.cn/specia...

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the chinese building a big lazer on the moon, to hold the earth to ransom for, 1 MILLION dollars.

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And people say the Chinese are bad drivers

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They should have some real good pictures coming back. Hopefully the fake moon landing freaks will fuck up now.

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Panoramic and 3D stereo cameras on board. Def should be some cool pics!

Another manned mission with 3D HD cameras would be amazing

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Yeoooo! Rabbit on the moon!

m.bbc.co.uk/news/scien...

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Why did they land the rover a day before the Mayan end date of 16th Dec 2013? Coincidence my haule

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This lake on Titan contains about 40 times more hydrocarbon liquid than Earth's global oil reservoir...

Imagine standing on the lush shores of a lake. Now imagine that it isn't one on Earth. The vegetation disappears, the temperature drops to -179ºC, and the sky takes on a sickly orange hue. Despite a bone-chilling breeze, the lake's dark surface lacks even the tiniest ripple. Welcome to Ligeia Mare on Titan.

Saturn's largest satellite is an eerie world about the size of Mercury. It is the only moon in the solar system with a thick, hazy atmosphere and the only place aside from Earth that has large bodies of liquid on its surface. But there's also one very big difference: on frigid Titan, the lakes and seas are filled with liquid hydrocarbons, such as methane. They also tend to be very smooth.

Read more - www.newscientist.com/a...

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First exomoon glimpsed – 1800 light years from Earth

Pandora and Endor, eat your hearts out. The first known moon outside of our solar system may have been found, and it seems weirder than we ever could have imagined.

Exomoons have long been predicted to exist – some may even be habitable worlds – but until now, no one had detected any. "This is the first serious candidate from any survey that I am aware of," says astronomer David Kipping of Harvard University, who was not involved in the discovery.

Read more - www.newscientist.com/a...

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bcove.me/cpo4hxey

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Space isn't the silent void it's made out to be. There's crazy vibration there, but it falls outside of the 20-20,000Hz range of human hearing

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That's your space god calling all his moomins on earth to put the kettle on he'll be there in 20 quantonium parsecs

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Nah, it's just our shite wee ears. They are surpassed by 'lesser' animals who enjoy licking their haule for warmth

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www.rebelsmarket.com/b...

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"There's crazy vibration there, but it falls outside of the 20-20,000Hz range of human hearing"

Where's the vibrations in the vacuum of space?

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The ether m8. You'd need to revive Einstein & Tesla to get to the bottom of the sums

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"Forget UFOs — there are a lot of objects and events in space that are identified, but still completely incomprehensible. From planets in our solar system, to inexplicable energy bursts from across the universe, here are some of the enduring mysteries of the space and time we call home" io9.com/the-objects-in...

Some really crazy shit out there that we simply haven't the first clue about, the gamma ray bursts are amongst the craziest

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A wee spacecraft to land on and drill into a comet this year...

io9.com/this-spidery-s...

Quite a few interesting things coming up in the next couple of years... I think I'm probably most excited about the JWST though. Think it's 2016!

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Have they started anything related to going to Europa yet?

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No plans to actually go as yet, I don't think, but there are a couple of missions planned to look more at Jupiters moons. Think I remember reading somewhere about them wanting to fly a probe through the jets of water vapour from Enceladus to see if it has any traces of anything which could prove that there is life living in the oceans below the ice.

Some more info here - www.universetoday.com/...

Dont really have time to look for other stuff, but plenty should come up on Google... just stick the moon name in and 'probe' and you'll probably get some good hits. The outer planets moons are so interesting. So is Saturns rings. I'd love to go see them lol

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*No plans to actually go as yet, I don't think, but there are a couple of missions planned to look more at Jupiters moons. Think I remember reading somewhere about them wanting to fly a probe through the jets of water vapour from Enceladus to see if it has any traces of anything which could prove that there is life living in the oceans below the ice.

.... rather than trying to drill through the ice.

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imgur.com/gallery/8FmbnNX

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hahaha

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New 'Hand of God' image captured by Nasa

www.independent.co.uk/...

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Possible new class of hypervelocity stars found www.iflscience.com/spa...

hard to get your head around something the size of our sun travelling at a million KPH through the galaxy

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Barely noticeable relative to the star though!

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Yeah but cool as fuck if you could park your spaceship in a safe place and watch it zoom past or better yet hit a small planetoid...

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Bet blurt gets to see all this cool shit when he gets reintegrated back into the void

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TRIVIA: The original coptic word for the AI which is responsible for the holographic multiverse we are currently involved in is "HAL". That's where Kubrick got his inspiration for 2001..

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Superhabitable worlds...

io9.com/what-would-the...

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mystery Martian rocks....
www.newscientist.com/a...

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Water found in stardust suggests life is universal - www.newscientist.com/a...

Wish they'd hurry the fuck up and find something.. anything...

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"Wish they'd hurry the fuck up and find something.. anything..."

Blinkered182. You waiting on the oh so honest Govt. sitting down and telling you the whole shebang?

Christ the Night

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www.theguardian.com/te...

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That's interestring, Fonz. Has further cemented my understanding

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blogs.discovery.com/in...

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Never heard of this mission before ys.org/news/2014-01-co...

One of the fastest spacecraft ever built—NASA's New Horizons—is hurtling through the void at nearly one million miles per day. Launched in 2006, it has been in flight longer than some missions last, and it is nearing its destination: Pluto.

The cameras on board would be able to make out individual building shapes if it where to fly past earth, should make for some interesting photos

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Yeah, it's going to be amazing. There only pics of Pluto are pretty poor.

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