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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Fuckin' hell. Some jump in investments in recent years! - arstechnica.co.uk/scie...

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It's going to be seriously exciting times when we start getting the hardware online which can analyse the atmospheres of exoplanets...

NASA find 20 potentially habitable worlds 'hiding in plain sight'

The study suggests there’s far more planets that could support life than we previously thought

www.independent.co.uk/...

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It’ll be simultaneously exciting and utterly fucking ‘orrible… once we get the tech and start identifying loads of planets displaying all sorts of potential biospheres harbouring life it’ll be a cunt knowing we’ll never be able to see just what has life evolved into on those planets

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Not necessarily. Maybe not in our lifetimes, but some of the ideas for bonkers telescopes of the future may allow it...

Astronomers Want to Use the Sun as a Massive Telescope

"The proposed gravitational lensing technique could produce high-quality images of exoplanets from hundreds of light-years away.

Such a telescope could image exoplanets at extremely high resolution, turning a single pixel into an image 1000 pixels across. This is enough to directly observe any continents on exoplanets a hundred light-years away."

www.popularmechanics.c...

More info here: www.airspacemag.com/da...

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An Artificial Intelligence Just Found 56 New Gravitational Lenses

Gravitational lenses are an important tool for astronomers seeking to study the most distant objects in the Universe. This technique involves using a massive cluster of matter (usually a galaxy or cluster) between a distant light source and an observer to better see light coming from that source. In an effect that was predicted by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, this allows astronomers to see objects that might otherwise be obscured.

Recently, a group of European astronomers developed a method for finding gravitational lenses in enormous piles of data. Using the same artificial intelligence algorithms that Google, Facebook and Tesla have used for their purposes, they were able to find 56 new gravitational lensing candidates from a massive astronomical survey. This method could eliminate the need for astronomers to conduct visual inspections of astronomical images.

While useful to astronomers, gravitational lenses are a pain to find. Ordinarily, this would consist of astronomers sorting through thousands of images snapped by telescopes and observatories. While academic institutions are able to rely on amateur astronomers and citizen astronomers like never before, there is imply no way to keep up with millions of images that are being regularly captured by instruments around the world.

To address this, Dr. Petrillo and his colleagues turned to what are known as “Convulutional Neural Networks” (CNN), a type of machine-learning algorithm that mines data for specific patterns. While Google used these same neural networks to win a match of Go against the world champion, Facebook uses them to recognize things in images posted on its site, and Tesla has been using them to develop self-driving cars.

www.universetoday.com/...

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How Can We Tell If A Space Rock Came From Outside Our Solar System?

"On October 19th, astronomers discovered an object unlike any other we'd seen before: a massive point of light hurtling through the inner Solar System. Sure, that might sound like any old asteroid or comet that just happens to pass close to the Sun, but this one was special. Unlike all the others we've ever seen, which came from the asteroid belt, the Kuiper belt, or even far out from the Oort cloud, this one was completely different. In fact, astronomers concluded, it came from outside the Solar System entirely. It's one thing to be told that this is the case, but it's quite another to understand how we know it must be so. Let's find out!"

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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The money being spent to send humans to a barren lifeless planet is insane yet we have moons with huge oceans under ice and are spending a fraction on them...

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lol RJ, you really have a thing against Mars.

Whether there's life on Mars or not, it's FAR easier to get to than the outer planets moons, especially for humans. And humans will do a far better job of finding evidence of life (alive or having lived there in the past) than any lander/rover/etc could do. Exploring the moons of the outer planets will come, but Mars is definitely a great mission to aim for in the shorter term. We could put all the resources for Mars missions into sending machines to the outer planets moons and still not get results on life, too.

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What's Next for Space Exploration?

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www.lettersofnote.com/...

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Metal asteroid Psyche is all set for an early visit from NASA

A new trajectory means the mission to uncover core facts about the asteroid belt will happen sooner than planned.

"Three times further away from the sun than the Earth lies an enormous lump of metal. Around 252km in diameter, the metallic “M-class” asteroid 16 Psyche is the target of NASA’s next mission to the belt of giant rocks that encircles the inner solar system. And the space agency now plans to visit it much sooner than originally planned.

Not only has the launch has been brought forward one year to the summer of 2022, but NASA’s scientists have also found a way to get to Psyche (pronounced SYKe-ee) much faster by taking a more efficient trajectory. The new route means the Psyche spacecraft won’t have to swing around the Earth to build up speed and won’t pass as close to the sun, so it needs less heat protection. It is now due to arrive in 2026, four years earlier than the original timeline.

The main aim of the journey to Psyshe is to gather more information about our own solar system. Psyche is one of many wandering members of the asteroid belt. Unlike the rest of its rocky neighbours, Psyche appears to be entirely made of nickel and iron, just like the Earth’s core. This, together with its size, has led to the theory that it might be the remains of the inside of a planet."

Read more: cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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Where will the next wave of space exploration take us?

cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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love these i.imgur.com/kNNvwuD.gifv hard to wrap yer head around

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Falcon Heavy. T - Minus 1 week. Test fire today.

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How The James Webb Space Telescope Will Deploy (In An Ideal World)

"The entire telescope is built, awaiting its final tests, instrument integration, and the last stages of assembly, before it's loaded onto the Ariane 5 rocket that will take it to its ultimate destination: to the L2 Lagrange point, over 1,000,000 kilometers from Earth. Despite all the challenges it's faced, it should be 100% ready-to-go when 2019 rolls around. Here's what we have to look forward to when the time comes."

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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The amount of things on thon telescope that can fuck up are immense, squeaky bum times for a few weeks for those lads

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They can image atmospheres of Kepler world's with this thing can't they?

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If they can read the number plate on that tesla, that would be impressive.

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www.space.com/39039-ma...

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www.nasa.gov/feature/g...

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Einstein’s Ultimate Test: Star S0–2 To Encounter Milky Way’s Supermassive Black Hole

After a 16 year wait, the star SO-2 will speed past our galaxy’s supermassive black hole at 2.5% the speed of light. It will be the first-of-its-kind test of Einstein’s theory.

This year, for the first time, astronomers will observationally measure a gravitational redshift around a supermassive black hole.

medium.com/starts-with...

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Black Hole Mergers To Be Predicted Years In Advance By The 2030s

"For the first time, we'll be able to know exactly when and where to point our telescopes to watch the fireworks from the very start."

"These extreme masses can generate signals of a much greater amplitude at a much lower frequency, meaning that they'll be detectable in an instrument like LISA not seconds, but weeks, months, or even years in advance. Rather than looking at your data after-the-fact and concluding, "hey, we had a gravitational wave event here a few minutes ago," you could look at your data and know, "in 2 years, 1 month, 21 days, 4 hours, 13 minutes and 56 seconds, we should point our telescopes at this location on the sky." It will mean we can make these predictions way in advance, and the era of real-time, predictive, multi-messenger astronomy will have truly arrived."

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Relativity Space reveals its ambitions with big NASA deal

"We have a pretty broad long-term vision."

"Even in an era during which the aerospace industry faces significant disruption from myriad new competitors, Relativity Space stands out. The company, led by a pair of twenty-somethings who used to work for Blue Origin and SpaceX, seeks to 3D print rocket engines and the boosters themselves, reducing the number of parts in an orbital rocket from 100,000 down to fewer than 1,000."

"Relativity is deep into development of its Aeon 1 rocket engine, which uses a mixture of oxygen and methane fuels. The Aeon engine has a modest vacuum thrust of about 19,500 pounds, less than one-tenth that of a Merlin 1D engine used in SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. It's also nearly four times more powerful than the small Rutherford engines that power Rocket Lab's smaller Electron rocket.

The key thing about the Aeon engine is not so much its raw performance but its lack of complexity. Ellis said the engine could be printed in fewer than 20 days, which accelerates the development and testing cycle. Moreover, the Aeon engine has just 100 parts, compared to a few thousand for most other engines."

arstechnica.com/scienc...

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Chinese space station will fall to Earth within two weeks

"China's first space station may fall to the ground as soon as one week from now, and certainly within two, orbital debris experts with the European Space Agency say. Scientists, however, still cannot predict with any confidence where pieces of the 10.4-meter long Tiangong-1 station, which is traveling at 17,000 km/h, will land.

The latest estimate from ESA indicates the station will enter Earth's atmosphere between March 30 and April 3, at which time most of the station will burn up. However, the station is large enough—it weighed 8.5 tons when fully fueled but has since used much of that propellant—that some pieces will very likely reach the planet's surface.

Beyond the fact that the station will reach a final impact point somewhere between 42.8 degrees North and 42.8 degrees South in latitude and probably near the northern or southern extremity of those boundaries due to Tiangong-1's orbital inclination, it is not possible to say where on Earth the debris will land. However, the likelihood of it affecting humans is quite low. Scientists estimate the "personal probability of being hit by a piece of debris from the Tiangong-1" is about 10 million times smaller than the annual chance of being hit by lightning."

arstechnica.com/scienc...

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wrong place for this but tried the internet and getting no response. Am i just being stupid or wha?

Can someone explain to me like im 5 a question about space i have had and find it hard to find a 100% answer online.

So say you were a person up in space somehow. What do you see with your own eyes not looking through the camera? Do you see stars. Or is it pitch black and the camera picks up what we cant see. I have read different accounts from different astronauts some say it was pitch black others say it was beautiful the amount of stars they could see. Can someone please explain to me whats the truth?

I understand the 'you cant see stars when the suns out' reasoning but then why would some astronauts say they see all the stars and others say they could not. The ISS passes into 'darkness' every 45 mins im lead to believe so can you not see stars then? We always hear about the beautiful view of earth from space but no one really seems to mention what its like looking away from the earth.

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by the way. Apparently as long as your looking away from the sun, you will see stars. Thats why you can see the sun light shining off the solar panels in that footage. Also, your eyes are more sensitive than a camera. That footage was probably a long exposure camera that was fixed on a star (so there isnt any trails)

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this pretty much sums up much of what i found. Everyone saying different things.

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My full research into this is about a night of googling, but keep finding different answers, thought it would be a simple google to find the answer, feel like a conspiracy nut the amount i looked into it and got nothing.

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Of course you can bloody see stars in space ffs, if your talking about why some photos taken in space don't show em that's more to do with exposure and those two huge light reflectors to moon and the sun

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Now, now RJ. No such thing as a stupid question in this thread.

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Yea RJ thats that i thought to start with. But why so many different answers from the people who have actually been there. In that video chris hatfield prob one of the most famous recent astronauts says two different things. I saw that interview from the iss before where he is talking about all the stars he could see from the iss . Then in another interview he said it was the blackest black he has seen. And tim peake said he couldn't see any stars and he was one of the last ones up there.

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When he was talking about the blackness, was that night in reference to the sheer blackness of space? Not the stars peppering it.

Good question though.

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