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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Fuckin' hell. Some jump in investments in recent years! - arstechnica.co.uk/scie...

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It's going to be seriously exciting times when we start getting the hardware online which can analyse the atmospheres of exoplanets...

NASA find 20 potentially habitable worlds 'hiding in plain sight'

The study suggests there’s far more planets that could support life than we previously thought

www.independent.co.uk/...

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It’ll be simultaneously exciting and utterly fucking ‘orrible… once we get the tech and start identifying loads of planets displaying all sorts of potential biospheres harbouring life it’ll be a cunt knowing we’ll never be able to see just what has life evolved into on those planets

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Not necessarily. Maybe not in our lifetimes, but some of the ideas for bonkers telescopes of the future may allow it...

Astronomers Want to Use the Sun as a Massive Telescope

"The proposed gravitational lensing technique could produce high-quality images of exoplanets from hundreds of light-years away.

Such a telescope could image exoplanets at extremely high resolution, turning a single pixel into an image 1000 pixels across. This is enough to directly observe any continents on exoplanets a hundred light-years away."

www.popularmechanics.c...

More info here: www.airspacemag.com/da...

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An Artificial Intelligence Just Found 56 New Gravitational Lenses

Gravitational lenses are an important tool for astronomers seeking to study the most distant objects in the Universe. This technique involves using a massive cluster of matter (usually a galaxy or cluster) between a distant light source and an observer to better see light coming from that source. In an effect that was predicted by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, this allows astronomers to see objects that might otherwise be obscured.

Recently, a group of European astronomers developed a method for finding gravitational lenses in enormous piles of data. Using the same artificial intelligence algorithms that Google, Facebook and Tesla have used for their purposes, they were able to find 56 new gravitational lensing candidates from a massive astronomical survey. This method could eliminate the need for astronomers to conduct visual inspections of astronomical images.

While useful to astronomers, gravitational lenses are a pain to find. Ordinarily, this would consist of astronomers sorting through thousands of images snapped by telescopes and observatories. While academic institutions are able to rely on amateur astronomers and citizen astronomers like never before, there is imply no way to keep up with millions of images that are being regularly captured by instruments around the world.

To address this, Dr. Petrillo and his colleagues turned to what are known as “Convulutional Neural Networks” (CNN), a type of machine-learning algorithm that mines data for specific patterns. While Google used these same neural networks to win a match of Go against the world champion, Facebook uses them to recognize things in images posted on its site, and Tesla has been using them to develop self-driving cars.

www.universetoday.com/...

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How Can We Tell If A Space Rock Came From Outside Our Solar System?

"On October 19th, astronomers discovered an object unlike any other we'd seen before: a massive point of light hurtling through the inner Solar System. Sure, that might sound like any old asteroid or comet that just happens to pass close to the Sun, but this one was special. Unlike all the others we've ever seen, which came from the asteroid belt, the Kuiper belt, or even far out from the Oort cloud, this one was completely different. In fact, astronomers concluded, it came from outside the Solar System entirely. It's one thing to be told that this is the case, but it's quite another to understand how we know it must be so. Let's find out!"

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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