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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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35

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Infinite Monkey Cage podcast special. All the panelists are astronauts.

ca.st/fww7

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Awesome

www.instagram.com/p/BX...

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When they successfully land all three of those in one day, I'm going to stop what Im doing and crack open a beer.

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Elon Musk post the first picture of the SpaceX space suit:

"First picture of SpaceX spacesuit. More in days to follow. Worth noting that this actually works (not a mockup). Already tested to double vacuum pressure. Was incredibly hard to balance esthetics and function. Easy to do either separately."

www.instagram.com/p/BY...

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That looks awesome.

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www.mirror.co.uk/scien... Clockwork rover for venus comminicating via morse code with an orbiting satelite

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Posted the write up of this a while ago, but worth seeing the size of these telescopes etc

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www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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A Huge Gravitational Wave Announcement Is About to Happen

www.sciencealert.com/n...

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Don’t know what else’s they can say? They’ve discovered it. Isn’t it just the same as then first using infrared to map stars. If they found something else causing gravitational wave. Surely it’s useless unless they can create their own gravitational waves and sure that’s never going to happen.

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?

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Wasn't a neutron star announcement but just another black hole measurement but one done with 10 times the accuracy and also triangulated with LIGO and VIRGO systems.

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"Surely it’s useless unless they can create their own gravitational waves and sure that’s never going to happen"

no shit Batman, it takes a massive cosmological event to produce detectable gravitational waves

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Hardly useless though

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exactly our ability to detect these waves with greater precision can lead to all sorts of cool shit, just a pity it wasnt from a neutron star as then we'd have visible light along with the gravitational waves and that shit would be a game changer

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Haha

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Elon Musk: Rockets will fly people from city to city in minutes

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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The little bag they give you on board will have toothbrush, sleep mask and change of underwear.

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Wonder if they will be doing speedy boarding.

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"A reusable, water-powered Mars lander that will allow humans to explore the Red Planet from an orbiting 'base camp' as early as the 2030s was unveiled Friday by US defence giant Lockheed Martin.

Governments and private firms are collaborating on projects to send humans to new frontiers, with NASA planning missions next decade into the space between Earth and the Moon to prepare for trips to Mars.

Lockheed Martin has been working on its "Mars Base Camp", a science laboratory that will orbit the planet, with the crewed lander set to descend to the surface on repeated missions.

"It looks a bit like Jules Verne, but it's actually more like an aircraft that we've flown in the past," Lockheed Martin's human spaceflight strategy chief Rob Chambers said, at a gathering of the world's leading space experts in the Australian city of Adelaide.

Up to four astronauts could join each two-week surface mission, while liquid hydrogen generated from water would fuel the spacecraft, he added.

"We can create that fuel. We can power this entire spacecraft system just with water," said Chambers, describing it as a "water-based economy".

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-09-lo...

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Fuck.

"In the book, he writes about a little-known incident that he says occurred during his first space station stint in 2010, when a Russian cosmonaut came untethered during a spacewalk and began floating away. Luckily, Oleg Skripochka happened to hit an antenna that bounced him back toward the space station, enabling him to grab on and save his life, according to Kelly.

Even though he was aboard the space station at the time, Kelly said he didn't learn about it until his yearlong mission five years later, when it casually came up in conversation with other cosmonauts. "I was like really? Holy crap. Crazy," Kelly recalled in an AP interview.

He remembered Skripochka had looked shaken, but thought it was because he had been out on his first spacewalk.
On Wednesday, the Russian Space Agency's press department said it contacted Skripochka, who did not confirm Kelly's account. No other comment was provided."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-10-as...

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"I've often pondered what we would have done if we'd known he was drifting irretrievably away from the station," Kelly writes. "It probably would have been possible to tie his family into the comm system in his spacesuit so they could say good-bye before the rising CO2 or oxygen deprivation caused him to lose consciousness—not something I wanted to spend a lot of time thinking about as my own spacewalk was approaching."

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www.independent.co.uk/...

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ok, now I see the use of measuring gravity waves. Thats pretty cool. Tell me this, what is the speed of gravitational waves?

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Speed of light

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I thought it was faster, so they had time to figure out where to point the telescopes. I thought maybe it was compressing space time somehow so it could travel faster.

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The light lasts for some time so they had time to turn telescopes in the right area of sky and catch some light but the waves are measured to within 0.2% to the speed of light.

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I'm not sure as I haven't read too much about it, but I'd guess that the telescopes were already pointing in the right direction and they could then say that the flash was the visible light from the merger which the gravitational waves came from.

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Thanks for that.

I did find this example that makes sense.

"Peter A. Schneider already gave the correct answer in the comments.

Do gravitational waves travel faster than light? No, gravitational waves also travel at the speed of light in vacuum.

However, the interstellar medium is not perfectly empty but filled with plasmas which slow electromagnetic waves (light, radio) down by a factor n, the refractive index. The slowing occurs because the photons are absorbed and reemitted, which takes some time. As far as I know, gravitational waves are not absorbed & reemitted and therefore travel with the speed of light in vacuum c as opposed to EM-waves which travel at a speed c/n.

At the bottom of this link is an example of how you could calculate the refractive index in space for radio waves: link (Edit: Please note that the link uses a different definition of refractive index, μμ = 1/n).

So, does this mean that gravitational waves reach us before light from a source? Yes."

Also, read that speed of light is not a good way to describe speeds of waves or photons. Its a universal constant that light happens to travel at.

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Another thing I read, is that the gravity waves actually start increasing as proton stars move towards eachother, so Ligo for example, starts to see increase in gravity waves. Also, they use other detectors around the world to help locate where in the sky its coming from. One in Italy actually could detect anything, and they used its blind spot to help narrow down search area.

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Cool

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Good summary of the recent neutron star merger

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Good podcast on the neutron star merger

ca.st/Nb0C

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Seeing One Example Of Merging Neutron Stars Raises Five Incredible Questions

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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the era of multimessenger astronomy

ysicstoday.scitation.o...

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r.e. gravitational waves, do they behave somewhat like ripples in a lake when you drop a stone i.e. more pronounced at the epicenter then gradually fading out over distance/time? if so does that mean that near the source of a gravitational wave would you be subject to massive time jumps?

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I imagine it would be more a case of time accelerating and slowing as on either side of the peak of each wave... but would an observer in the path of the wave even be aware of this due to relativity???

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RJ, I've been wondering something similar and been meaning to look it up. I was more thinking about what the affects would be that we could see/feel if we were far closer, so along the same lines. Have a read at this thread for some info regarding being closer. From what I gather, there wouldn't be any major affects to time or anything - ysics.stackexchange.co...

Also this article is an interesting read -
www.forbes.com/sites/b...

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They stretch space basically. Which is mental. Maybe just a microscopic level at greater distances.

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www.upi.com/Science_Ne...

Seems a bit to bizarre that a object can manage to sling shot from one star to another and this speed. Has to be a aliens.

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I was reading about that earlier, mm. A Queens Uni guy is leading up the study of it - ys.org/news/2017-10-as...

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Yeah, apparently they didnt catch it until it had already passed us.

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