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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Direct copy n paste pav. Not my work ;)

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lol
i.imgur.com/h0qx2Sl.jpg

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And our females dont have any genitals.

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Russia seeks new cosmonauts

"Russia's space agency on Tuesday announced a recruitment drive for young would-be cosmonauts who it hopes will become the country's first on the Moon. And women are welcome, an official stressed. In the first such drive for five years, Roscosmos space agency said it is looking for 6 to 8 cosmonauts who will operate a new-generation spaceship now in development and "will become the first Russians to fly to the Moon". Russia is keen to rekindle the space triumphs of the Soviet era after a series of embarrassing glitches in recent years. It has announced plans for its first manned Moon landing by 2031."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-03-mo...

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What Will Happen When Betelgeuse Explodes?

Every star will someday run out of fuel in its core, bringing an end to its run as natural source of nuclear fusion in the Universe. While stars like our Sun will fuse hydrogen into helium and then -- swelling into a red giant -- helium into carbon, there are other, more massive stars which can achieve hot enough temperatures to further fuse carbon into even heavier elements. Under those intense conditions, the star will swell into a red supergiant, destined for an eventual supernova after around 100,000 years or so. And the brightest red supergiant in our entire night sky? That's Betelgeuse, which could go supernova at any time.

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Help find Planet Nine

Have you ever thought about discovering a planet? It may not be as fanciful as you think.
Astronomers at the Australian National University (ANU) want help in searching for a ninth planet thought to be orbiting our Solar System.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/wor...

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This is pretty cool

Supermassive black holes give birth to stars, astronomers discover

A team of astrophysicists has discovered that supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies aren't just destroyers of stars, but can also be their creators.

www.cbc.ca/beta/news/t...

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SpaceX just landed a reused rocket making history. Takeoff 30 minutes into this video

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The roaring and shouting.

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Rise Of The Super Telescopes: The James Webb Space Telescope

"The James Webb Space Telescope“>James Webb Space Telescope (JWST, or the Webb) may be the most eagerly anticipated of the Super Telescopes. Maybe because it has endured a tortured path on its way to being built. Or maybe because it’s different than the other Super Telescopes, what with it being 1.5 million km (1 million miles) away from Earth once it’s operating."

www.universetoday.com/...

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Rise Of The Super Telescopes: The Thirty Meter Telescope

"The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is being built by an international group of countries and institutions, like a lot of Super Telescopes are. In fact, they’re proud of pointing out that the international consortium behind the TMT represents almost half of the world’s population; China, India, the USA, Japan, and Canada. The project needs that many partners to absorb the cost; an estimated $1.5 billion.

The light collecting capability of the TMT will be 10 times that of the Keck Telescope, and more than 144 times that of the Hubble Space Telescope."

www.universetoday.com/...

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That post I put up a couple of days ago to help find PLanet 9, astronomers are now investigating unknown objects that could be candidates for a new planet in our Solar System with the help from volunteers.

Four unknown objects being investigated in Planet 9 search

Lead researcher Dr Brad Tucker said about 60,000 people from around the world had classified over four million objects in space as part of the ANU-led citizen search for the so-called Planet 9.

"We've detected minor planets Chiron and Comacina, which demonstrates the approach we're taking could find Planet 9 if it's there," said Dr Tucker from the ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Dr Tucker said the SkyMapper telescope at Siding Spring used as part of the project was crucial in ruling out areas in the southern sky where Planet 9 could be situated.

"We've managed to rule out a planet about the size of Neptune being in about 90 per cent of the southern sky out to a depth of about 350 times the distance the Earth is from the Sun," he said.

"With the help of tens of thousands of dedicated volunteers sifting through hundreds of thousands of images taken by SkyMapper, we have achieved four years of scientific analysis in under three days. One of those volunteers, Toby Roberts, has made 12,000 classifications."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-03-un...

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Take A Peek Inside Blue Origin’s New Shepard Crew Capsule

Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos provided a sneak peek today into the interior of the New Shepard crew capsule, the suborbital vehicle for space tourism. He released a few images which illustrate what the flight experience might be like on board.

“Our New Shepard flight test program is focused on demonstrating the performance and robustness of the system,” Bezos said via an email release. “In parallel, we’ve been designing the capsule interior with an eye toward precision engineering, safety, and comfort.”

The interior has six seats with large windows for a great view of our planet.

“Every seat’s a window seat,” Bezos said.

What looks like a console in the center of the capsule is actually the escape motor to protect future passengers from any anomaly during launch. Unlike the Apollo escape system that used an escape “tower” motor located on top of the capsule to ‘pull’ the crew cabin away from a failing booster, New Shepard’s escape system is mounted underneath the capsule, to ‘push’ the capsule away from a potentially exploding booster. Blue Origin successfully tried out this escapes motor in October 2016 during an in-flight test.

www.universetoday.com/...

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joshworth.com/dev/pixe...

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If the moon were only 1 pixel accurate solar system

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Map ffs

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Saturn's Moon, Enceladus, Is Our Closest Great Hope For Life Beyond Earth

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Cassini

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NASA Presentation on Cassini's final act

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Atmosphere around super-Earth detected

Astronomers have detected an atmosphere around the super-Earth GJ 1132b. This marks the first detection of an atmosphere around an Earth-like planet other than Earth itself, and thus a significant step on the path towards the detection of life on an exoplanet. The team, which includes researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, used the 2.2 m ESO/MPG telescope in Chile to take images of the planet's host star GJ 1132, and measuring the slight decrease in brightness as the planet and its atmosphere absorbed some of the starlight while passing directly in front of their host star.

While it's not the detection of life on another planet, it's an important step in the right direction: the detection of an atmosphere around the super-Earth GJ 1132b marks the first time an atmosphere has been detected around an Earth-like planet other than Earth itself.

Astronomers' current strategy for finding life on another planet is to detect the chemical composition of that planet's atmosphere, on the look-out for certain chemical imbalances that require the presence of living organisms as an explanation. In the case of our own Earth, the presence of large amounts of oxygen is such a trace.

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-04-at...

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In 2015 the Curiosity rover discovered a kind of wind-rippled sand dune never seen before on Mars or here on Earth.

This view of the surface of a sand dune on Mars shows two different sizes of ripples created by wind. Sand dunes, like the small ripples seen here, are familiar sights on Earth. The bigger ripples are around 3 meters apart and have not been seen before, on Earth or on Mars. The larger ripples have distinctive sinuous crest lines.

The picture is a composite created from multiple images taken by the mast camera on NASA’s Curiosity rover on December 13 2015, or the rover’s 1192nd Martian day at work. The images were taken in the early morning on Namib Dune, in the Bagnold Dune Field, which forms a dark band along the northwestern side of Mount Sharp.

cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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Life on Enceladus?
cience.sciencemag.org/...

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Not the average space thread post, but still class

Tim Peake's message for Limavady boy with autism - www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-...

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Impressive. The people look tiny next to it.

Image: James Webb Space Telescope mirror seen in full bloom

ys.org/news/2017-04-im...

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Podcast on the search for life on Mars:

Hunting for Life on Mars

As a small rocky planet, Mars is similar in many respects to the Earth and for that reason, many have thought it may harbour some kind of life. A hundred years ago, there was serious talk about the possibility of advanced civilisations there. Even in early 1970s, scientists mused that plant-like aliens might grow in the Martian soil. The best hope now is for something microbial. But the discovery that even simple life survives there or did some time in its history would be a profound one. We would know that life is not something special to Earth.

NASA’s Curiosity rover has discovered that 3.7 billion years ago, there were conditions hospitable to life on Mars – a sustained period of time with lakes and rivers of water. The earlier rover Spirit found deposits of silica from ancient hot springs which some planetary scientists argue bear the hallmarks of being shaped by microbes - possibly.

The next five years may dramatically advance the hunt for life on Mars. In 2020 the European and Russian space agencies will send their ExoMars rover. That will drill two metres into the Red Planet’s surface and sample material shielded from the sterilising radiation. It will analyse for life both extant and extinct. In the future, robotic or possibly human missions may even explore Martian cave systems in Mars' vast volcanoes. Monica talks to Nasa's Penny Boston whose adventures in some of the world's most dangerous caves have convinced her that underground is the best place to look.

Monica Grady is Professor of Planetary and Space Science at the Open University.

www.bbc.co.uk/programm...

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Superluminal Speeds (faster than light) - Sixty Symbols

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Pretty amazing how much clearer the infrared image is...

Comparison of the Small Magellanic Cloud in infrared and visible light

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A close-up look at VISTA's view of the Small Magellanic Cloud

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www.eso.org/public/ima...

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www.theguardian.com/sc...

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"The finding demonstrates the extraordinary advances that researchers have made with imaging technology and “adaptive optics”, which allowed the astronomers to spot ripples on a sea of lava 391 million miles away with a telescope perched on an Arizona mountaintop."

incredible advancement... cant wait to see all these future large telescopes come online

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Pretty interesting idea for what might be happening with Tabby's Star...

New Ideas For The Mysterious Tabby’s Star: A Gigantic Planet Or A Planet With Rings

Led by Fernando J. Ballesteros, the team used data obtained by the Kepler mission to create a model of the system that could account for all the dips in brightness. These include the up to 20% drop that was observed in 2015 and the non-periodic repetitions and asymmetric dips that followed. From this, they determined that a ringed body and Trojan asteroids that share its orbit could explain the first large dip and the subsequent period of dips.

www.universetoday.com/...

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Star Gives Birth to Possible Black Hole in Hubble and Spitzer Images

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www.theverge.com/2017/...

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Good write up on LISA - www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Could asteroids bombard the Earth to cause a mass extinction in 10 million years?

"Today, there are approximately 190 impact craters from asteroids and comets on Earth. They range in size from only a few meters to more than 100km across. And they formed anywhere between a few years ago and more than two billion years ago. Only a few, like the famous "Meteor crater" in Arizona, are visible to the untrained eye, but scientists have learned to recognise impact craters even if they are covered by lakes, the ocean or thick layers of sediment.

But have these craters formed as a result of regular asteroid collisions? And if so, why? There have been many suggestions, but most prominently, some scientists have suggested that the sun has a companion star (called "Nemesis") on a very wide orbit, which approaches the solar system every 26m to 30m years and thereby triggers showers of comets.

There are other suggestions. One idea is based on the observation that the sun moves up and down slightly as it orbits the galaxy, crossing the galactic disk every 30m years or so. Some have suggested that this could somehow trigger comet showers."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-06-as...

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Could a dedicated mission to Enceladus detect microbial life there?

"We need a spacecraft to travel to Enceladus, fly through a geyser plume, and analyze the water that is immediately accessible," Geoffrey Marcy, a retired professor of astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, told Astrowatch.ne.

Marcy is a renowned exoplanet researcher who discovered many extrasolar worlds. He was one of the co-investigators of NASA's Kepler planet-hunting mission that detected more than 4,000 exoworlds. He was also involved in studies focusing on detecting signals from extraterrestrial civilizations and was the principal investigator of the Breakthrough Listen project. The program, funded by billionaire Yuri Milner, is looking for signs of extraterrestrial civilizations by searching stars and galaxies for radio signals and laser transmissions.

Marcy emphasizes that when it comes to searching for signs of microbial life in our solar system, assistance from billionaires investing in space projects could be helpful.

"The NASA missions, as currently planned, will require at least 20 years before a detection of microbial life will happen, at the earliest. However, a brilliant team of billionaires could work with NASA to fund a spacecraft to Saturn's moon, Enceladus. It could capture the water spurting out the geysers and use conventional microscopes to detect any microbial life there," Marcy said.

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-06-de...

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SpaceX goes for a launch doubleheader this weekend

"It's a big weekend for SpaceX, the California rocket company that has already had a big year. On Friday, the company will attempt to launch BulgariaSat-1, a commercial communications satellite, to a geostationary orbit. On Sunday, the company will attempt to launch a second batch of Iridium satellites into low Earth orbit. If successful, this weekend would put the company on pace for a record-smashing number of missions this year."

arstechnica.co.uk/scie...

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Spacex Launch in 30 minutes. Apparently Falcon 9 reentry forces will be most difficult ever. Good chance it won't make it according to Elon.

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Japan reveals plans to put a man on moon by 2030

"Japan has revealed ambitious plans to put an astronaut on the Moon around 2030 in new proposals from the country's space agency.

This is the first time the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has said it aims to send an astronaut beyond the International Space Station, an agency spokeswoman told AFP on Friday.

The idea is to first join a NASA-led mission in 2025 to build a space station in the moon's orbit, as part of a longer-term effort by NASA to reach Mars."

ys.org/news/2017-06-ja...

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NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

"Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the gas giant's iconic, 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm. This will be humanity's first up-close and personal view of the gigantic feature -- a storm monitored since 1830 and possibly existing for more than 350 years."

www.nasa.gov/feature/j...

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A year at Jupiter: Juno has revealed the giant of the Solar System

"Scientists get as excited as anyone about seeing new pictures of the mysterious worlds that populate our vast Solar System—from Mercury's day-and-night terminator to Pluto's icy mountains. For far longer than most people, astronomers imagined what these diverse planets, dwarf planets, and moons must look like from up close.

It's true that planetary scientists such as Fran Bagenal are more interested in data than anything else, and this often goes far beyond pixels. But as an astronomer who has been involved with many of NASA's Solar System probes, from Voyager to New Horizons and Juno, Bagenal fully appreciates the value of images of capturing the public imagination."

arstechnica.co.uk/scie...

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The pics are the best part though. Watched the martian there the other night another bullshit rescue . These space films never have a good ending.

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100 billion brown dwarfs may populate our galaxy

"The Milky Way may contain as many as 100 billion brown dwarfs, according to new research to be published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Brown dwarfs are failed stars that were not quite heavy enough to sustain the hydrogen fusion reactions that make real stars shine. They weigh about 10 to 100 times as much as Jupiter, which means their internal gravitational pressure is enough to fuse deuterium (a kind of hydrogen that contains an extra neutron in each atom) and sometimes also lithium. This means they glow only dimly. Most of the radiation they do give off is in the infrared spectrum and hence invisible to the human eye, though some would appear faintly purple or red."

cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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Sorry, Donald Trump, It Can't Be Infinity

"Last week, the President of the United States issued an executive order reviving the National Space Council. But at the end of the President's remarks, immediately following the signing of the order, he made the following statement:

This is infinity here. It could be infinity. We don’t really don’t know. But it could be. It has to be something — but it could be infinity, right?

The Universe is the most all-encompassing thing we have access to, but we've known for a long time that all we'll ever travel to, communicate with, or even observe, absolutely cannot be infinite.

When you look out at the distant Universe, beyond the stars in our own galaxy to the great cosmic abyss beyond, there continue to be more and more galaxies as far as our most powerful telescopes can see. But this pattern won't continue on forever. The farther away we look, the farther back in time we look, and so we see galaxies as they were in the past."

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Hidden lake discovery sheds light on alien hunt

Evidence of new strains of bacteria in a lake hidden under an Icelandic glacier far from the sun has revealed how life might thrive in sub-surface oceans on the icy moons around Saturn and Jupiter.

"Our preliminary results reveal new branches of life here," said Dr Gregory Farrant from Matís, a governmental research institute based in Iceland.

The lake – called Skaftárkatlar – is one of the best places on earth to study how life might evolve in the isolation of a subterranean ocean on a far away moon, as it lies beneath an ice sheet 300 metres thick and its waters have probably never been exposed to the atmosphere.

"It's tricky to analyse DNA of microbes that are totally new to science because there's no prior knowledge about them," explained Dr Farrant, who is the lead investigator on an EU-funded research project called AstroLakes. "We're dealing with a lot of unknowns."

ys.org/news/2017-07-hi...

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Is It Possible To Pull Something Out Of A Black Hole?

Once something falls into a black hole, it can never get out. No matter how much energy you have, you can never move faster than the speed of light, and yet you'd need to in order to exit of the event horizon once you've crossed inside. But what if you tried to cheat that little rule by tethering a tiny object that just dipped inside the event horizon to a much larger, more massive one that was destined to escape? Could you pull something out of a black hole that way, or any other way? The laws of physics are restrictive, but they should tell us whether it's possible or not. Let's find out!

A black hole isn’t merely an ultra-dense, ultra-massive singularity, where space is curved so tremendously that anything that falls in can’t escape. Although that’s what we conventionally think of, a black hole is more accurately the region of space around this objects from which no form of matter or energy — not even light itself — can escape. This isn’t as foreign or exotic as you might think: if you took the Sun, exactly as-is, and compressed it down to a region of space just a few kilometers in radius, a black hole is exactly what you’d wind up with. Although our Sun is in no danger of undergoing such a transition, there are stars in the Universe that will wind up producing a black hole in this very fashion.

Read more: www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Ive pulled out of yer ma.

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Russian Scientists Just Launched An "Artificial Star" That Could Threaten Astronomy

A Russian Soyuz rocket has successfully launched a controversial satellite into orbit, which will become one of our brightest stars in a few days – and may hamper astronomical observations.

The satellite is called Mayak, developed by Moscow State Mechanical Engineering University (MAMU) and funded with $30,000 through Russian crowdfunding website Boomstarter. We first learned about it back in early 2016, and on Friday, July 14, it launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan along with 72 other satellites.

"The satellite launch was good, and we are waiting for NORAD [North American Aerospace Defense Command] to track it,” Alexander Panov from Mayak told IFLScience. “Roscosmos reported that everything was as planned, without any additional info.”

Mayak is a cubesat, a small satellite about the size of a loaf of bread. But once in position about 600 kilometers (370 miles) above Earth, it will unfurl a giant pyramid-shaped sail made of Mylar that’s designed to reflect the Sun. It will span 16 square meters (170 square feet) and is apparently 20 times thinner than human hair.

www.iflscience.com/spa...

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