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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Hubble captures brilliant star death in 'rotten egg' nebula

"The Calabash Nebula, pictured here—which has the technical name OH 231.8+04.2—is a spectacular example of the death of a low-mass star like the sun. This image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the star going through a rapid transformation from a red giant to a planetary nebula, during which it blows its outer layers of gas and dust out into the surrounding space. The recently ejected material is spat out in opposite directions with immense speed—the gas shown in yellow is moving close to one million kilometers per hour (621,371 miles per hour).

Astronomers rarely capture a star in this phase of its evolution because it occurs within the blink of an eye—in astronomical terms. Over the next thousand years the nebula is expected to evolve into a fully-fledged planetary nebula.

The nebula is also known as the Rotten Egg Nebula because it contains a lot of sulphur, an element that, when combined with other elements, smells like a rotten egg—but luckily, it resides over 5,000 light-years away in the constellation of Puppis."

ys.org/news/2017-02-hu...

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Giving us the edge

"The telescope that goes by the name Square Kilometre Array will be the largest global, collaborative science project ever. If all goes to plan, in 2018 the first of 130,000 antennae will be rolled out on a remote red plain a few hundred kilometres north-east of Geraldton, Western Australia. A sister telescope will be built on another remote red plain, the Karoo, about 600 kilometres north-east of Cape Town, South Africa.

To get a clear image of the early universe, SKA-low will have to crunch data at an unprecedented scale – greater than the entire global internet traffic per day.

The innovations that will emerge from this big data project promise huge windfalls. The Word Wide Web was the spin-off when CERN – the home of the Large Hadron Collider – needed to find a way to manage its big data problem. Wi-Fi was the offshoot when CSIRO researchers learnt how to realign the scrambled signals from black holes."

cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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USED SPACEX BOOSTER SET FOR HISTORIC 1ST REFLIGHT IS TEST FIRED IN TEXAS

"The first orbit class rocket that will ever be reflown to launch a second payload to space was successfully test fired by SpaceX engineers at the firms Texas test facility last week.

The once fanciful dream of rocket recycling is now closer than ever to becoming reality, after successful completion of the static fire test on a test stand in McGregor, Texas, paved the path to relaunch, SpaceX announced via twitter."

www.universetoday.com/...

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martian polar ice
eos.org/research-spotl...

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www.theguardian.com/sc...

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Electronics for venus lander
ysicstoday.scitation.o...

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New Report Details How NASA Could Land on Europa

A team of scientists laid out extensive details about a hypothetical future landing mission to find life on Jupiter's moon.

“Every mission is a stepping stone for the future,” said Sarah Hörst, an atmospheric chemist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md., and member of the Science Definition Team (SDT) that created the report. At NASA, the mantra is “first you fly by, then you orbit, then you land, then you rove,” she said.

Currently, plans are in the works for a Europa flyby mission that will launch in the 2020s and orbit Jupiter, providing scientists with more than 40 flybys of the icy moon. But even a flyby mission can’t tell you everything, Hörst said. The “history of exploring the solar system has told us that every place we go is more interesting than we thought it was when we decided to go there,” she continued. A lander would be able to reveal small-scale details about Europa’s surface composition—and whether it’s habitable or already supporting life.

eos.org/articles/new-r...

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This is a great video.

Telescopes of Tomorrow

"Super telescopes are coming! NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope is now 27 years old, but a new generation of telescopes are on their way. Find out about the James Webb Space Telescope, the Giant Magellan Telescope and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. The telescopes of tomorrow will see in infrared and ultraviolet. They will peer through space and scan across time. They will allow us to find new supernovae, spot potentially hazardous asteroids, better understand dark energy and peer into the earliest moments of space time."

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Class!

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Beat me to it takki. Unreal. Like computer graphics lol

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The speed of the progress is pretty crazy.

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Nasa to host major press conference on 'discovery beyond our solar system'

The event will see the revelation of major information about exoplanets, or planets that orbit stars other than our sun, according to a release. It made no further mention of the details of what would be revealed.

www.independent.co.uk/...

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From the comments section of that article it seems this maybe what's going to be announced?

reflexions.ulg.ac.be/c...

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hmm, red dwarf stars can be a bit harsh with solar flares and radiation though - ys.org/news/2017-02-na...

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1616

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"These planets disturb one another in fact. Therefore, the gravitational interactions between them will influence their orbital periods according to their respective masses. By observing dozens of transits and the small variations in the moments when they are produced, we will be able to deduce the mass of each of these planets. We will then have a much better idea of their composition: rocky planets like the Earth, quite rich in metals like Mercury, or even rich in ice like the moons of Jupiter”

this shit still blows my mind that we can tell so much about these planets through observations like this, really cant wait for the next generation of scopes to come online

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Yeah, same here lad. Absolutely amazing.

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Star system found with 7 exoplanets orbiting, 3 of which are in the habitable zone meaning it's a great system to look for potential life outside of our solar system.

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Star's seven Earth-sized worlds set record - www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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The James Webb is gonna fuck up isn't it, it's gonna blow on the launch pad...

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I'm actually shitting myself about the JWST.

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same here Takk, never felt anything towards any launches before but i really really want the JWST to succeed badly, its such a piece of equipment that the amount of stuff that needs to go right is just plain fucking crazy and if it launches and gets into its orbit and something goes wrong its too far to go fix

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NASA's Eyes on Exoplanets

Get set for launch. “Eyes on Exoplanets” will fly you to any planet you wish—as long as it's far beyond our solar system. This fully rendered 3D universe is scientifically accurate, allowing you to zoom in for a close look at more than 1,000 exotic planets known to orbit distant stars.

With the click of a mouse, you can visit newly discovered gas giants, Earth-sized planets and “super Earths”—rocky like ours, but gargantuan. The program is updated daily with the latest finds from NASA's Kepler mission and from ground-based observatories around the world as they hunt for planets like our own.

You can instantly find out the time it would take to travel to each planetary system by car, jet plane, bullet train or starship. Use an overlay to compare the orbits of planets in our solar system with those around other stars. Or you can search for planets that might support life by toggling the “habitable zone” display, showing the region around a star where temperatures are right for liquid water.

“Eyes on Exoplanets” is powered by NASA's Exoplanet Archive, the official database used by professional astronomers engaged in exploring new worlds.

eyes.jpl.nasa.gov/eyes...

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Some great diagrams in info on TRAPPIST-1:

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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mobile.twitter.com/elo...

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Scientists readying to create first image of a black hole

A team of researchers from around the world is getting ready to create what might be the first image of a black hole. The project is the result of collaboration between teams manning radio receivers around the world and a team at MIT that will assemble the data from the other teams and hopefully create an image.

The project has been ongoing for approximately 20 years as project members have sought to piece together what has now become known as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). Each of the 12 participating radio receiving teams will use equipment that has been installed for the project to record data received at a frequency of 230GHz during April 5 through the 14th. The data will be recorded onto hard drives which will all be sent to MIT Haystack Observatory in Massachusetts, where a team will stitch the data together using a technique called very long baseline array interferometry—in effect, creating the illusion of a single radio telescope as large as the Earth. The black hole they will all focus on is the one believed to be at the center of the Milky Way galaxy—Sagittarius A*.

A black hole cannot be photographed, of course, light cannot reflect or escape from it, thus, there would be none to capture. What the team is hoping to capture is the light that surrounds the black hole at its event horizon, just before it disappears.

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-02-sc...

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Bonkers. www.spacex.com/news/20...

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Rise Of The Super Telescopes

We humans have an insatiable hunger to understand the Universe. As Carl Sagan said, “Understanding is Ecstasy.” But to understand the Universe, we need better and better ways to observe it. And that means one thing: big, huge, enormous telescopes.

In this series we’ll look at 6 of the world’s Super Telescopes:

The Giant Magellan Telescope
The Overwhelmingly Large Telescope
The 30 Meter Telescope
The European Extremely Large Telescope
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope
The James Webb Space Telescope

The Giant Magellan Telescope

The GMT’s primary mirror consists of 7 separate mirrors: one central mirror surrounded by 6 other mirrors. Together they form an optical surface that is 24.5 meters (80 ft.) in diameter. That means the GMT will have a total light collecting area of 368 square meters, or almost 4,000 square feet. The GMT will outperform the Hubble Space Telescope by having a resolving power 10 times greater.

There’s a limit to the size of single mirrors that can be built, and the 8.4 meter mirrors in the GMT are at the limits of construction methods. That’s why segmented systems are in use in the GMT, and in other super telescopes being designed and built around the world.

These mirrors are modern feats of engineering. Each one is made of 20 tons of glass, and takes years to build. The first mirror was cast in 2005, and was still being polished 6 years later. In fact, the mirrors are so massive, that they need 6 months to cool when they come out of casting.

They aren’t just flat, simple mirrors. They’re described as potato chips, rather than being flat. They’re aspheric, meaning the mirrors’ faces have steeply curved surfaces. The mirror’s have to have exactly the same curvature in order to perform together, which requires leading-edge manufacturing. The mirrors’ paraboloidal shape has to be polished to an accuracy greater than 25 nanometers. That’s about 1/25th the wavelength of light itself!

In fact, if you took one of the GMT’s mirrors and spread it out from the east coast to the west coast of the USA, the height of the tallest mountain on the mirror would be only 1/2 of one inch.

Read on: www.universetoday.com/...

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Giant Magellan Telescope

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Rise Of The Super Telescopes: The Overwhelmingly Large Telescope

The OWL (Overwhelmingly Large Telescope) was a gargantuan telescope proposed by the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The OWL was going to be a 100 meter monstrosity, which would dwarf anything in operation at the time. Sadly, OWL was eventually cancelled.

For now, anyway.

OWL’s design called for a 100 meter diameter mirror, built out of 3264 segments. It would have had unequalled light-gathering capacity, and the ability to resolve details down to a milli-arc second. (A milli-arc second is approximately the size of a dime, placed on top of the Eiffel Tower, and viewed from New York City.)

www.universetoday.com/...

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bloody hell at the size of thon thing, it wouldve been incredible to simply visit

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The new telescopes that'll be coming online over the next while are awesome. Can't wait to see what they can do.

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recreating the martian atmosphere
www.popularmechanics.c...

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What Surprises Might NASA's Future Space Telescopes Discover?

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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your scudding this mission takki ffs

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There's Going to Be a New Star in the Sky

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US Government Issues NASA Demand, ‘Get Humans to Mars By 2033’

Both chambers of Congress just passed the NASA Authorization Act of 2017. With this transformative development, the space agency got a lot more than just $19.508 billion in funding. They also got a very clear mandate: Get humanity to Mars.

To be clear, Mars has been in the works for some time; however, the 2017 Act places a strong emphasis on this goal, making it the focal point of NASA’s long-term plans. In the document, congress asserts that the space agency is to get humans “near or on the surface of Mars in the 2030s.” Opposition to the bill from the administration isn’t expected, so it’s more than likely to be passed into law by the presidency.

futurism.com/us-govern...

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Good stuff need to bate the cufflinks to it before they set up a sweatshop on it

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If they'd just give musk the cash and take the red tape of nasa out of it, they'd be there a lot quicker.

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Harvard Scientists Theorize That Fast Radio Bursts Come From Alien Space Travel

Could these mysterious flashes of radio waves come from a planet-sized device to power alien spacecraft?

Fast radio bursts (FRB) are perhaps the most mysterious phenomena we observe in the cosmos. Earlier this year, astronomers announced they had pinpointed an FRB for the first time in a dwarf galaxy that sits three billion light-years away. These intense blasts of radio waves last only 1 to 5 milliseconds, and they have perplexed astronomers since the first one was discovered in 2007.

The leading theories suggest that FRBs come from incredibly volatile cosmic events, such as material being ejected from supermassive black holes, the explosions of superluminous supernovae, or rotating magnetars that lash surrounding material with their immense magnetic fields. But researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) have proposed a much more enticing theory. What if FRBs aren't natural phenomena at all, but rather come from a massive artificial structure used to power alien spacecraft?

www.popularmechanics.c...

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"Astronomers have long known that Pan, one of Saturn’s innermost moons, has an odd look. Based on images taken from a distance, researchers have said it looks like a walnut or a flying saucer. But now, NASA’s Cassini probe has delivered stunning close-ups of the 35-kilometer-wide icy moon"

www.sciencemag.org/new...

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Holding Pattern Contrails over Europe
www.reddit.com/r/space...

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*chemtrail

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