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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Solar System's Next Close Encounter Will Be With Gliese 710, Say Astronomers

New data from the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Gaia mission has given astronomers unprecedented accuracy in predicting that Gliese 710, a K-spectral type star a little more than half the size of our Sun, will cross into our solar system’s Oort Cloud of comets some 1.35 million years from now.

According to a paper recently published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, Gliese 710 will swipe through a swath of the Oort Cloud’s estimated few trillion comets, which in turn circle our solar system at distances of up to a light year.

www.forbes.com/sites/b...

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Inflating time lapse of the ISS’s new expandable habitat

gifly.me/media/b3kc4

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2017 Moon Calendar

i.imgur.com/pl5hA1x.jpeg

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NASA release potential design for Mars habitition
www.sciencealert.com/n...

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Caught in Action: Avalanches on North Polar Scarps

"Amazingly, this HiRISE image has captured at least four avalanches, or debris falls, in action.

Cameras orbiting Mars have taken thousands of images that have enabled scientists to put together pieces of Mars' geologic history. However, most of them reveal landscapes that haven't changed much in millions of years. Some images taken at different times of year do show seasonal changes from one image to the next; however, it is extremely rare to catch such a dramatic event in action. (Another, unrelated, active process that has been captured by Mars cameras are dust devils.) Observing currently active processes is often a useful tool in unlocking puzzles of the past for scientists studying the Earth. Working from primarily still images, it is harder for scientists studying Mars to rely on this tool. The HiRISE image of avalanching debris is a very rare opportunity to directly do so."

irise.lpl.arizona.edu/...

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"A German Lunar X-Prize team has announced its intentions to send two mobile probes to the Moon to inspect the lunar rover left behind by the Apollo 17 mission. Finally, something that’ll get the Moon landing conspiracy nutters to shut the hell up.

The group, known as PT Scientists, is one of 16 teams currently vying for the $30 million Google Lunar X-Prize, a competition requiring a private group to land an autonomous vehicle on the Moon, travel more than 500 meters (1,640 feet), and transmit high-definition photographs back to Earth. The group is currently working with German automobile manufacturer Audi to develop the rover, and it has signed a deal with broker Spaceflight Industries to secure a ride on a commercial launch vehicle (which rocket company is yet to be determined)."

gizmodo.com/german-mis...

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Brightest Supernova Ever Seen Was Actually Something Much Darker

"Last year, astronomers recorded the brightest supernova explosion ever seen. Follow up observations now suggest this cataclysmic event wasn’t a supernova at all, but rather, an extremely rare celestial phenomenon involving a supermassive black hole and a rather unfortunate star.

In 2015, astronomers participating in the the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) witnessed what they thought was an unusually bright supernova. Dubbed ASASSN-15lh, it was twice as bright as the previous record holder, shining 20 times brighter than the total light output of the entire Milky Way galaxy."

gizmodo.com/brightest-...

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"Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been in orbit around the Moon since the summer of 2009. Its laser altimeter (LOLA) and camera (LROC) are recording the rugged, airless lunar terrain in exceptional detail, making it possible to visualize the Moon with unprecedented fidelity. This is especially evident in the long shadows cast near the terminator, or day-night line. The pummeled, craggy landscape thrown into high relief at the terminator would be impossible to recreate in the computer without global terrain maps like those from LRO.

The Moon always keeps the same face to us, but not exactly the same face. Because of the tilt and shape of its orbit, we see the Moon from slightly different angles over the course of a month. When a month is compressed into 24 seconds, as it is in this animation, our changing view of the Moon makes it look like it's wobbling. This wobble is called libration."

Read more about this: vs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4537

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The Absurdity of Detecting Gravitational Waves

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holy shit at the science behind that detection.. thats some mindboggling stuff

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Earth and Moon as Seen from Mars

otojournal.jpl.nasa.go...

More info: otojournal.jpl.nasa.go...

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Great description of LIGO and detecting gravitiinal waves. The professor seems like a GBOL. Would love to have a drink with him, maybe a movie after

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This is class. Watch it in a VR headset if you can.

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chandra.si.edu/photo/2...

Those are all black holes!

"This image contains the highest concentration of black holes ever seen, equivalent to 5,000 over the area on the sky covered by the full Moon. Made with over 7 million seconds of Chandra observing time, this is the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. These data give astronomers the best look yet at the growth of black holes over billions of years soon after the Big Bang."

Read more: chandra.si.edu/photo/2...

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Another article on the above - www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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""the James Webb Space Telescope will teach us an incredible amount about the Universe, including further details about how stars form, what the earliest stellar populations look like, will show us gas giants and rogue planets in unprecedented detail and will tell us what made up the Universe at any given time in the past. It will show us a whole slew of things that Hubble cannot, by virtue of it reaching to much longer wavelengths of light than Hubble could ever hope to see. And with its huge, large-aperture primary mirror, it will be able to collect more light in a single day than Hubble could in a week. The most exciting things, of course, will be the unexpected: the things we'll discover that we don't even know to look for yet.""

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Seeking Signs of Life and More: NASA's Mars 2020 Mission

"The rover will assess the geology of the landing site and analyze surface targets for signs of ancient life using imaging, organic and inorganic geochemistry, and mineralogy. Notably, the rover, also called Mars 2020, will also be the first to select, collect, and cache a suite of samples from another planet for possible future return to Earth, fulfilling the vision of the most recent planetary science decadal survey to take the first step toward Mars Sample Return.

Previous rovers used sophisticated analytic instruments and prepared rock and soil specimens for analysis on board the rover itself. Mars 2020, however, will be the first rover tasked with detailed exploration of the surface to support the collection of a large, high-value sample suite designated for possible later study in laboratories back on Earth.

Conceptually, Mars 2020 marks a transition from missions in which sampling guided exploration to one where exploration guides sampling. In other words, the rover’s scientific instruments will observe the surrounding terrain and provide the critical context for choosing where samples will be collected. Ultimately, this context will also be used to interpret the samples. This evolution is familiar on Earth, where initial field observations and limited sampling in the service of geologic mapping lead to hypotheses that are eventually tested through focused sample collection and laboratory analysis."

Read on: eos.org/project-update...

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Juno probe's Jupiter mission update

"On Tuesday 5 July 2016, Nasa’s Juno probe dropped into Jupiter’s orbit after a five-year, 1.4 billion-mile journey. Five months on, we ask what fresh insights we’ve gained into Jupiter’s structure, its history, and its extraordinary weather systems. And with engine problems, radiation belts to dodge, and the solar system’s largest gas giant to navigate, how has the probe held up?

To answer all this and more, Ian Sample is joined by Fran Bagenal from the University of Colorado, as well as Randy Gladstone and Juno’s principal investigator Scott Bolton, both from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas."

www.theguardian.com/sc...

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Planetary puzzle: what's causing Venus' giant wave?

A huge stationary structure, spotted by a Japanese probe, defies explanation.

"It extends from the north pole, across the equator, and down to the south pole. It's more than 10,000 kilometres end to end and, at around 500 ºC, is hotter than its surrounds."

cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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The SpaceX booster landing itself is even more impressive when you see people standing next to it

imgur.com/a/WYIKn

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How to Make First Contact

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Takk you seen Arrival yet?

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Yeah, watched it the other night actually. Thought it was pretty good, up until the last quarter/ending. Seemed like it was really going somewhere, then it just seemed to froot out at the end and go for a quick, safe and kinda boring ending.

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ack ffs, mate said exactly the same thing... i was hoping this was gonna be a knock it outa the park kinda movie from some of the reviews i read.. waiting on the 1080 web rip before watching

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Yeah, it's worth a watch like, but wouldn't say it's anything special or a 'must see'.

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i hyped the bollocks outa this for myself reading these reviews..

"So when I heard Denis Villeneuve was making a realistic movie about aliens, I just about wet my pants. My expectations could not have been higher. They were exceeded. ARRIVAL is a masterpiece. It is already on my list of all-time favorite science fiction films." www.aintitcool.com/nod...

"ARRIVAL is a beautifully human story that allows unfiltered emotion to come into play in a big way. I’ve actually seen the film twice so far, and I can attest that watching it a second time, knowing all of its secrets, is an even more enriching experience than the first. Going in with an open mind will certainly help, but I believe that about every film we see. ARRIVAL is easily one of my favorite films of the year. "www.aintitcool.com/nod...

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I'd imagine there are people who would find the whole film, including the last part of it, absolutely brilliant. I just kinda thought it could have had a better final act. It is a pretty well made and classy film, TBF. I just think the ending was weak.

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Mars rover Curiosity examines possible mud cracks

"Scientists used NASA's Curiosity Mars rover in recent weeks to examine slabs of rock cross-hatched with shallow ridges that likely originated as cracks in drying mud.

"Mud cracks are the most likely scenario here," said Curiosity science team member Nathan Stein. He is a graduate student at Caltech in Pasadena, California, who led the investigation of a site called "Old Soaker," on lower Mount Sharp, Mars.

If this interpretation holds up, these would be the first mud cracks—technically called desiccation cracks—confirmed by the Curiosity mission. They would be evidence that the ancient era when these sediments were deposited included some drying after wetter conditions. Curiosity has found evidence of ancient lakes in older, lower-lying rock layers and also in younger mudstone that is above Old Soaker."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-01-ma...

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Is That Ship From “Passengers” Really Possible?

"In the new movie "Passengers," we are shown a vision of an interstellar spaceship capable of bridging the immense gulf between the stars.

But how feasible is such a spacecraft? We examine some of the real-life technology being investigated to make such spacecraft a reality."

futurism.com/is-that-s...

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Earth from Saturn

i.imgur.com/t1nC4IV.jpg

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Five finalists will try to land a spacecraft on the Moon this year to win the Google Lunar X Prize

www.theverge.com/2017/...

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Did The Tunguska Event Of 1908 Leave A Hidden Impact Crater?

The Tunguska event of June 1908 is one of the most heavily referenced “unexplained” events of the 20th century. It comes up in both fiction and in reality all the time, and considering what probably caused it, you really can’t blame anyone for looking to it for inspiration.

Almost every respectable scientist has concluded that the gigantic explosion in remote Siberia – which flattened 80 million trees and smashed windows in towns 60 kilometers (37 miles) away – was caused by the air burst of a meteor. However, the lack of solid geological evidence for the original meteor, and a heavily delayed investigation into the incident, has convinced plenty that there must be a more outlandish explanation.

A group of Italian researchers have for at least a decade suggested that there was indeed a meteor blast, but one in which at least part of the space rock remained intact and smashed into Siberia. They go as far as to claim that they have found the original impact crater.

Read more: ys.org/news/2012-05-te...

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World's Largest Telescope Will Revolutionize The Future Of Astronomy

"The GMT will be the largest optical telescope ever designed and built, and construction has not only already begun, it's expected to see first light in 2023 and to reach completion in 2025. It will gather more than 100 times the light of the space-based Hubble, and more than five times as much as any currently existing ground-based telescopes."

Read more here: www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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NASA's New Astronaut Suits Are Straight Out of 2001: A Space Odyssey

“The most important part is that the suit will keep you alive,” astronaut Eric Boe said in a press release. “It is a lot lighter, more form-fitting and it’s simpler, which is always a good thing. Complicated systems have more ways they can break, so simple is better on something like this.”

gizmodo.com/nasas-new-...

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A great write up on the incoming telescopes of our future

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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that looks proper scify

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I want one.

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“Get me a napkin quick. There's a turd floating through the air.”

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This is pretty surprising

As identical twins, the brothers are genetically very similar. However, researchers found that while he was in orbit, Scott’s telomeres—the caps on the ends of chromosomes—grew longer than his twin brother’s. Though Scott’s telomeres returned to their pre-flight lengths shortly after he returned to Earth, these results were totally unexpected, since telomeres naturally shrink over the course of one’s life, and the stresses of spaceflight are supposed to accelerate this. At least that was the idea.

“That is exactly the opposite of what we thought,” Susan Bailey, a radiation biologist at Colorado State University, told Nature.

gizmodo.com/first-scie...

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Saturn rising from behind the moon

i.imgur.com/6zsNGcc.gif

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Watch Four Gas Giants In Orbit Around Another Star For The First Time - i.giphy.com/26gshMKt4x...

Read more about this: www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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NASA to Explore an Asteroid Containing Enough Mineral Wealth to Collapse the World Economy

"But besides the scientific value, such explorations are on the brink of launching an entire new industry. Elkins-Tanton has estimated the value of the asteroid’s iron content alone at approximately $10,000 quadrillion. That’s to say nothing of the gold, copper, and platinum to be found.

The value of this asteroid alone could wipe out global debt, $60 trillion, and leave enough left over to give every human on the planet a comfortable lifestyle, or conversely, cause the collapse of the world economy and send us hurdling back to the Dark Ages. Take your pick."

bigthink.com/philip-pe...

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How an Interstellar Starship Could Actually Explore Alpha Centauri www.gizmodo.co.uk/2017...

Can someone explain why we are doing this?? the probe is that small it wont be able to do pretty much anything once it gets there nor will it be able to send signals of any worth back, not to mention the time it'll take... so why we bothering? other than to progress certain aspects of the science behind it or am i missing something

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Why do anything beyond Earth? It's exploration. It will lead to new technologies, new understanding, new horizons and goals. Maybe someday, we could venture there, and these early steps in exploration will have helped towards that.

It's like asking Galileo why he studied the planets, or why Christopher Columbus went on his voyage, or what the point in making and sending up the Hubble Space Telescope, or submarines and robotics to the bottoms of the oceans or the moon or other planets...

Why have humans done anything beyond the most basic tasks to stay alive, right in front of their noses.

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I get all that bit, but the probe they're proposing to send is so small that the science it could conceivably collect and send back would probably be no more than what we could probably ascertain when all the new very large earth & spacebound telescopes come online not to mention the time frames were talking about put the whole thing out of reach of ours and probably the next generation so surely the money would be better spent developing technologies that bring the planets in our solar system closer cause let’s face it the stars are out of our reach

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Have a look through the Starshot website. There's plenty of good info in there about what the concept of the mission is and how it can be done, the problems to overcome first, etc.

breakthroughinitiative...

In regards the timeframe part, they're talking of 20 years (for the journey), and that's on top of the extra time needed to develop the technologies for carrying out certain parts of the mission, but all in all, it's well within a normal lifetime of a human. And considering it took the New Horizons probe almost 10 years to reach Pluto (and was in planning from around 2000), 20 or even 30 years isn't that bad to get to a neighbouring star.

As for using the time/money for new technologies for closer to earth space exploration, again I go back to why we explore in the first place. We don't explore certain things because it's the quickest and easiest thing to explore. We explore things because we want to know more about them, push the boundaries, etc.

If we were to live within the chain of thought you mentioned, we could just roll back that idea even closer to home and ask why are we even in space at all when there's 97% of the ocean unexplored here on earth or parts of the rainforests unexplored with potentially decades worth of new science and research to do right on our doorstep? Why even bother spending the money on rockets, space technology, going to space?

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sure if you roll that thought ever further back why bother with leaving the trees? ;-P what im saying is were spending a ton o money to send a wee probe to a system that in a few years we'll be able to see through a telescope, there's a lot of ifs and buts about the endeavor but personally id rather all the money was put into getting a probe and a lander onto Europa & Enceladus

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The Strangest Moon In The Solar System

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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