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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Go for it start a philosophical thread add this question as number 1.
1. If someone could explain the concept of time and how we see ourselves in the "now" timeframe. Why do we have a fairly short lifespan yet inside our brain we process the entire universe as "now". Always melts me trying to think about it. *toke*

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There is no such thing as now. Just a past and a future.

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worldview.space

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An amazing look into Star Cluster Terzan 5

i.imgur.com/nZXpJxF.gifv

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How Much Would it Cost to Live on the Moon?

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Sentinel-1A Satellite Slammed by Space Debris

"Large collisions are very rare, because big objects are few. But there are vastly more smaller objects in space than big ones, making smaller collisions more common. In fact, on Aug. 23, the European Space Agency satellite Sentinel-1A suffered an impact from a small object, probably just a few millimeters across, which slammed into one of its solar panels and left a visible dent nearly a half meter across."

www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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This is stunning. Would love to see it in 4K.

The OVERVIEW EFFECT (in up to 4K)

"The overview effect is a cognitive shift in awareness reported by some astronauts and cosmonauts during spaceflight, often while viewing the Earth from orbit or from the lunar surface."

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The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

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Atoms As Big As Mountains — Neutron Stars Explained

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What's Left to Explore?

Inside Science at New Scientist Live Festival

Adam Rutherford is joined by astronaut Tim Peake, astrobiologist Zita Martins and oceanographer Helen Czerski discussing what’s left to be discovered.

ca.st/DaTn

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SpaceX’s Big Fucking Rocket – The Full Story

Yesterday, Elon Musk got on stage at the 2016 International Astronautical Congress and unveiled the first real details about the big fucking rocket they’re making.

A couple months ago, when SpaceX first announced that this would be happening in late September, it hit me that I might still have special privileges with them, kind of grandfathered in from my time working with Elon and his companies in 2015 (which resulted in an in-depth four-part blog series). So I reached out and asked if I could learn about the big fucking rocket ahead of time and write a post about it.

They said yes...

waitbutwhy.com/2016/09...

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8')

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False color image of Saturn's north pole from Cassini.

i.imgur.com/rIR1Crtl.jpg

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Is there more info on that, Gerry?

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Launch at 51:27 if this link doesn't take your straight there

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The rocket tech these days is getting fucking amazing.

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Good write up on that test launch - www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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Moving Planetarium Watch
i.imgur.com/GBZEebk.jpg

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Price is $245,000 in 18k rose gold and $330,000 in 18k rose gold with diamond decoration. Yeah, its expensive! Also, its a limited edition and there is only 396 pieces.

Article if someone interested: www.ablogtowatch.com/v...

Video:

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Watchmaking really does blow my mind. The precision is just insane.

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lol next video that came on after that is Robert Downey Jr. showing his watch collection. Head case.

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Nearby Earth-Like World Proxima B May Have A Global Ocean

www.iflscience.com/spa...

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Two Space Agencies Will Try to Make a Historic Landing on Mars Next Week

"ExoMars, an astrobiology mission designed to hunt for signs of geologic and biological activity on Mars, is on track to reach orbit on October 19th. When it arrives, the mission’s two components—a Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and a Schiaparelli lander—will part ways. The TGO will insert itself into a low-altitude orbit and begin scanning the Martian atmosphere for methane, water vapor, and other trace gases. Schiaparelli, meanwhile, will attempt to reach the surface in one piece."

gizmodo.com/two-space-...

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NASA picks six deep space habitat prototypes and studies

cosmosmagazine.com/tec...

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We Were Very Wrong About the Number of Galaxies in the Universe

gizmodo.com/we-were-ve...

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I wish our brains could comprehend numbers of that magnitude. I wish I could properly take in how many stars are in all of those galaxies and how many planets each of those stars have. Mind blowing stuff.

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One if the things that completely melts me is the sheer volume of the universe for all that to fit in it, and with huge spaces in between it all. Bonkers. Makes earth seem insanely special.

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Somewhat tongue in cheek this, but still, there probably will come a time when this sort of thing is something needing to be looked in to...

Scientists plan to create 'Asgardia' nation state in space

A group of scientists is launching what they say will be a new pacifist nation-state in space. Asgardia "will become a place in orbit which is truly 'no man's land'," its website says. The new "nation" aims to launch its first satellite late next year and hopes to one day be recognised by the UN. But some experts have cast doubt on the viability of the plan, given international law prohibits national sovereignty claims in outer space. "Citizens" of Asgardia, who will be scrutinised before admission, will eventually obtain passports, says Lena de Winne, a senior member of the project team who worked for the European Space Agency for 15 years.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/wor...

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lol i.kinja-img.com/gawker...

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lol love that, you could change the text to any of the daft things from religion too

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i think it perfectly sums up the absolute stupidity of religion

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Great podcast talking about the recent black holes, the discovery of gravitational waves and what it means, plus what possibilities there are moving forwards

Black Holes: A Tale of Cosmic Death and Rebirth
ca.st/X4Gl

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not the recent black holes. *black holes and the recent discovery of grav waves

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AN EXOPLANET WITH HUGE RINGS INTRIGUES

"Back in 2007, astronomers observed a series of unusual eclipses coming from a star 420 light years from Earth. In 2012, a team from Japan and the Netherlands reasoned that this phenomena was due to the presence of a large exoplanet – designated J1407b – with a massive ring system orbiting the star. Since then, several surprising finds have been made."

www.universetoday.com/...

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Imagine this moving at several kilometers a second... :/

Exclusive Photos Of The Recently Found 30-Ton Argentine Meteorite

www.universetoday.com/...

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WOW

"In September of 2016, JAXA/NHK released their SELENE (KAGUYA) High Definition Television (HDTV) data to the public. It's basically a treasure trove of epic moon/earthrise(set) material."

More info - www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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High def video camera on the ISS. You can see cars driving.

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Soyz and Progress above the night thunderstorm on Earth

i.imgur.com/kRIzJnS.jpg

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Class

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Space rocket booster deal for east Belfast company Thales

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-...

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Moment of truth awaits Europe's Schiaparelli Mars probe

The European Space Agency (Esa) is getting ready to put a probe on Mars. Its Schiaparelli robot will attempt the risky descent to the surface in the coming hours, after a 500 million km journey from Earth.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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Tomorrow, the Schiaparelli lander lands on Mars using a crushable structure instead of legs. The aluminium structure can withstand a deceleration of 40Gs. Here it is being tested.

i.imgur.com/lxERCOo.gifv

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ExoMars aerodynamic test

i.imgur.com/Xs6NdMC.gifv

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Schiaparelli Mars lander has crashed.
www.bbc.com/news/scien...

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Sad, but at lleast iit wasn't an hhugely important one or was going to do a lot of experiments.

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Spacewalk live stream

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Part of this really blew my mind, and it's easily one of the coolest theories I've enjoyed wrapping my head around in a long time. And it seems like it could makes sense.

It's the bit about how time slows down so much inside a black hole (due to time dilation). As all the material that makes up the black hole is being compressed and compressed, eventually it hits its maximum compression, it then bounces back and explodes out again. To us it seems like it isn't happening, it just seems like material is falling into the black hole and is being destroyed/never returning, as this is happening so slowly relative to our flow of time, but from the inside of the black hole where the gravitation forces are at unimaginable levels, it would be happening at normal speed, the speed that time passes relative to it's own mass. So on the inside, the collapse and bounce back out again could happen in an extremely short amount of time, like a millisecond, yet viewed from the outside, it could take billions of years.

Bonkers, but amazing.

Loop Quantum Gravity (this link should move the player to the correct part of the podcast, but if it doesn't, the story starts at 12 minutes and 31 seconds: ca.st/7yGe#t=751

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