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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Meet the 'space train' concept that can get to Mars in 2 days

"In space, the most expensive portions of travel are the acceleration and deceleration phases. The energy required for those portions is tremendous, especially for something as heavy as a space train. In addition, if you were to start hauling cargo, it would become very expensive,"

"However, once the train reached its cruising speed, its energy consumption would be minimal. That’s the idea behind the Solar Express concept. It would never stop; instead, space wagons/capsules would rendezvous with it."

While it’s important to keep in mind that this is just a conceptual idea and not a project actually being implemented in reality (yet, anyway), the team is looking at outside-of-the-box solutions to humanity’s space travel problems.

www.sciencealert.com/m...

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SpaceX has another rocket explode.
www.bbc.com/news/world...

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New images of Jupiter

NASA has released spectacular images of Jupiter that have never been seen before.

They were taken by the Juno space probe and capture detail that no other space mission has ever managed to photograph.

Scientists say the mission will give an unparalleled understanding of the largest planet in our solar system.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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"The download of six megabytes of data collected during the six-hour transit, from above Jupiter’s north pole to below its south pole, took one-and-a-half days"

Kinda like my first forays into internet porn back in the dialup days

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Missing comet lander Philae spotted at last

ys.org/news/2016-09-or...

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akkischitt.com/stuff/r...

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Why tonight’s launch of an asymmetric rocket is must-see TV
arstechnica.com/scienc...

Midnight BST

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Neptune and Triton taken by Voyager in 1979.

i.redd.it/i0kxxgdn2ykx...

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damn

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Class pic there, Gerry. The outer gas giants really are mysterious.

Absolutely loving No Man's Sky at the minute due to seeing some epic views of planets and moons and things, then being able to just fly down and land on them to explore and see what strange things might live there, or not as some places are barren.

i.imgur.com/PFmGeMX.jpg

i.imgur.com/wnIVUAz.jpg

i.imgur.com/ZU3O1tT.jpg

i.imgur.com/SFY9A2s.png

images.akamai.steamuse...

images.akamai.steamuse...

i.redd.it/suib31dxbkkx...

i.imgur.com/3GOBj8I.png

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Astronauts falling on the moon

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After four years on Mars, the Curiosity rover has made some pretty impressive discoveries. These have ranged from characterizing what Mars’ atmosphere was like billions of years ago to discovering organic molecules and methane there today. But arguably the biggest discovery Curiosity has made has been uncovering evidence of warm, flowing water on Mars’ surface.

Unfortunately, now faced with what could be signs of water directly in its path, NASA is forced to enact strict protocols. These signs take the form of dark streaks that have been observed along the sloping terrain of Aeolis Mons (aka. Mount Sharp), which the rover has been preparing to climb. In order to prevent contamination, the rover must avoid any contact with them, which could mean a serious diversion.

www.universetoday.com/...

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Amazon's chief Jeff Bezos unveils new rocket design

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos unveiled plans Monday for a massive rocket called New Glenn designed to launch people to space and propel satellites into orbit, raising the ante in the US commercial space industry. Bezos, who also owns the Washington Post, said the rocket has been in the works for the past four years, and will be launched by decade's end.

At 270 feet (82 meters) high for the two-stage New Glenn and 313 feet tall for the three-stage version, the rocket will be taller than any on the market today, including SpaceX's Falcon 9 (224 feet). The New Glenn is dwarfed only by the Saturn V rocket (363 feet tall) that propelled Apollo era astronauts to the Moon in the 1960s and 1970s.

Read more at: ys.org/news/2016-09-am...

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The Curiosity Rover Makes Its Way Up A Martian Mountain

mars.nasa.gov/msl/curi...

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As fantastic as those pictures look I really wish we’d get some serious scifi looking shit, can you imagine a rover on one of the moons of Jupiter or Saturn looking up into the night sky and seeing those planets as backdrop.. but I guess actual real science wins

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That will be epic, RJ. Until then, No Man's Sky ;D

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www.newscientist.com/a...

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Star's dust cloud gives birth to giant planet

TW Hydrae is estimated to be about 10 million years old and is one of the closest young stars to Earth. Thanks to its proximity and the fact that its axis of rotation points in Earth's direction, astronomers are able to get a face-on view of the developing planetary system. The young star is surrounded by a disc made of tiny dust particles. Variations in the signal received by Alma allow researchers to estimate the size of these dust grains. Smaller, micrometre-sized dust particles dominate the most prominent gap in the disc, which has a radius of 22 astronomical units (AU - equivalent to the mean distance from the centre of the Earth to the centre of the Sun).

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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China will launch its second 'Heavenly Palace' space lab tomorrow

China's space program successfully completed its first round in a new phase of space exploration back in September 2011 when it launched the "Heavenly Palace" Tiangong-1 space laboratory. That was just the first stage in a plan to put a large-scale station up in orbit in the mid-2020s for extended astronaut missions rivaling those of the ISS. The next milestone will happen tomorrow when they launch Tiangong-2 into orbit, their second "Heavenly Palace" lab at 10:04 AM ET that will get a visit from a pair of Chinese taikonauts in four to six weeks.

www.engadget.com/2016/...

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First-Ever Discovery: Complex Organic Molecules Found on Rosetta’s Comet

The scientists behind Rosetta report that the probe has found complex, solid organic matter in the dust particles of the comet, the kind we’ve never expected to find. Previous missions could not collect these solid organic molecules, since these missions were merely flybys. Ultimately, they crafts moved too fast, disrupting the particles too much for a proper characterization.

But Rosetta has the ability to lower its speed so that such information can be gathered. By slowing down, it was able to collect 27,000 dust particles, enough for its COSIMA mass spectrometer to get a proper reading.

“Our analysis reveals carbon in a far more complex form than expected,” remarked Hervé Cottin, one of the authors of the paper, in a statement. “It is so complex, we can’t give it a proper formula or a name!”

futurism.com/first-eve...

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NASA's bold plan to capture an asteroid rock

In an ambitious five-year mission, NASA hopes to rendezvous with a near-Earth asteroid, pluck a boulder from its surface and practice a technique called a “gravity tractor” in an attempt to alter an asteroid’s orbit.

It will then return the boulder to orbit around the moon where astronauts will collect samples and practice space techniques that may someday take us to Mars.

The Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) is currently in the planning stages with an anticipated launch date of December 2021. Its goals range from science to technology development to planetary defence, says John Holdren, science advisor to US president Barack Obama.

cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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30-TON CHUNK OF 4,500 YEAR-OLD METEORITE UNEARTHED IN ARGENTINA

A gigantic 30-ton chunk of the famous Campo del Cielo meteorite fall has been found outside of a small town in Argentina. The Gancedo meteorite was found on September 10, 2016 by a team of meteorite hunters from the Astronomy Association of the Chaco. This is the second largest piece ever found in the Campo del Cielo region.

Gancedo is the name of the town and Chaco is the province in Argentina where the meteorite was found.

Scientists estimate about 4,500 years ago, a 600 ton space rock entered Earth’s atmosphere and broke apart, sending a shower of metallic meteorites across a 1,350 square km region northwest of Buenos Aires. The region has at least 26 craters.

www.universetoday.com/...

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www.lsu.edu/science/ne...

These guys have a helluva roadmap ahead of them, gonna take a right few years to get to the end but it'll be some craic when they do

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That'll be great research and development for robotics for exploring icey moons...

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Genesis project – a plan to seed life on other planets

Spreading life to the farthest reaches of space sounds like science fiction straight out of Star Trek, but the technology needed for this kind of exploit is just decades away, according to a theoretical physicist.

Claudius Gros from Germany’s Goethe University describes the Genesis project, which involves a fleet of autonomous robots that drop microbes onto suitable exoplanets in the hope they survive and flourish, in Astrophysics and Space Science.

Only planets without life, but with the potential for at least a few hundred million years of habitability, would get the go-ahead.

The spacecraft would then synthesise a variety of single-celled organisms using its on-board gene laboratory. From there it’d be up to these cells to survive the drop tucked inside nano-sized capsules, start inhaling carbon dioxide and churn out oxygen.

cosmosmagazine.com/spa...

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That’s the whole end game, to develop and eventually deploy an ice tunnelling ROV into the depths of Europa or Titan. The logistics of which must be huge, I dare say we simply don’t have the technology to do it yet but by the time these guys have the ROV sorted out hopefully NASA and its other partners have figured out the delivery part of the problem.

Its equal parts frustrating as well as fascinating, as this is literally the very first steps in a lonnnnng journey so I’ll probably be well into my sixties ffs by the time this mission is a go.

On a related note, I wish the fuck the Russians would release some new info on their new attempts at penetrating Vostok

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NASA to Announce 'Surprising' Europa Discovery Monday www.space.com/34131-ju...

Care to guess?

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The intriguing Phobos monolith.

i.imgur.com/vIQQN7B.jpg

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That is weird as fuck, Gerry. Must look into that more.

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Its just a large rock, nothing to see here move along...

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If I guessed, I'd say they're just conforming the ocean under ice, if it's not been confirmed yet, RJ. It could be a step to increase awareness (public and political) to look for funding for a mission there.

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Unfortunately that’s my guess, confirmation of liquid water under the ice, would be nice if it was something cool for a fucking change

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some speculation on Nasa Monday teleconference www.space.com/34151-na... fact that its a teleconference means it wont be mind shattering ffs

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U.S. Senate panel authorizes increased NASA funding for Mars mission, shuttle replacement

www.usatoday.com/story...

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In recent months, there’s been growing evidence that Pluto is hiding a liquid water ocean beneath its frozen surface. New models by researchers at Brown University support this hypothesis, and take it one mind-boggling step further: Pluto’s ocean may be more than 100 kilometers (62 miles) deep.

gizmodo.com/plutos-liq...

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What 'Impossible Physics' Would Be Possible With Warp Drive?

When warp drive was first brought into the public consciousness with the debut of Star Trek fifty years ago, our understanding of the Universe was fundamentally different than it is today. For one, warp drive was simply a plot device to reach the distant stars without having characters and the Universe age; it was thought to violate Einstein’s relativity as a physical impossibility. For another, it was thought that gravity was working to pull the distant galaxies back towards one another, and that if you traveled close enough to the speed of light, you’d eventually reach anything; we didn’t know about dark energy. In 1998, the accelerating Universe taught us that only 3% of the galaxies in the observable Universe would ever be reachable at the speed of light. But in 1994, Miguel Alcubierre discovered a solution in General Relativity that catapulted warp drive into the realm of the physically possible. Could warp drive enable us to reach those galaxies after all? Peter Tibbles asks exactly that:

Would it be possible using the Alcubierre drive to reach those galaxies now thought to be out of reach?

Not only is the answer yes, but that’s just the start of what’s possible.

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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Mercury found to be tectonically active, joining the Earth as the only other geologically active planet in the Solar System

www.nasa.gov/feature/t...

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SpaceX CEO Musk to present 'mind blowing' Mars plan

SpaceX chief Elon Musk is set Tuesday to unveil his ambitious plan to build a human colony on Mars after sending a manned spacecraft to the Red Planet within a decade. He will lay out his vision during a presentation titled "Making Humans a Multiplanetary Species" at the International Astronautical Congress in the western Mexican city of Guadalajara. Although the South Africa-born Canadian-American entrepreneur has given few details about his plan, he promised in a Washington Post interview in June that it will be "mind blowing."

He will discuss the "long-term technical challenges that need to be solved to support the creation of a permanent, self-sustaining human presence on Mars," the conference's program says. SpaceX plans to send an unmanned Dragon cargo capsule to Mars as early as 2018, paving the way for a human mission that would leave Earth in 2024 and arrive on the Red Planet the following year.

However, experts are skeptical of the feasibility.

Read more at: ys.org/news/2016-09-sp...

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Starting in 5 minutes.

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I like the idea. Theyve thought it through. 10 years first manned flight to mars. Eventually see the price of flight falling to price of average house. He seems less worried about radiation exposure. I'd more worried about sending a man into orbit on one of his current ships. I think thats slated for the Falcon Heavy Rockets launches.

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It's a bold idea. It'll be interesting to see how things go. Seems like it's a bit too ambitious, but I guess if anyone had the drive to do it, it's probably him.

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That SpaceX Interplanetary Transport System video was unreal.

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SpaceX - 2002
i.imgur.com/TeFSy3F.png

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Compilation of all technical slides from Elon's IAC presentation

imgur.com/a/20nku

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Look at these stats compared to the Saturn V. Unbelievable. i.imgur.com/SzdaMGm.png

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Seen a few articles making out that Elon Musk has asked people to 'die for him' etc... he's just being honest about the risks, though. And its not that he wants people to potentially die for him, it's for the advancement and survival of the human species. When explorers got on boats to sail across oceans to unknown lands, people knew the risks and still went. Now we travel back and forth across those deadly waters all the time like its nothing. Kinda makes you think what things might be like in a hundred years, if these first few maiden voyages go ahead. Amazing.

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Thankgod the world has people like Musk, Gates & Suckerberg spending their billions trying to move mankind forward instead of the Russian, Chinese & Arab billionaires interested only in one upping each other with bigger boats

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They're doing way more good than most world leaders.

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I don't know if I should post a Philosophical thread. Don't know if it would have legs. But I know the greatest question of our time is, what's the meaning of life/universe. It usually happens after a few smokes. Putting it another way, 'what the fuck is it all about'. If you had 3 questions to help figure it all out, what would they be. *toke*

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