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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Mercury's journey across Sun under way

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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Mercury transit of the Sun. Some size, thon.

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Kepler Findings: NASA Announces Discovery of More Than 1,200 New Alien Planets

futurism.com/kepler-di...

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on.io9.com/n3ISxBF

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Active Volcano on Jupiter's Moon Io

otojournal.jpl.nasa.go...

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First contact: how we’ll get the news that we found aliens

Cathal O’Connell explains the challenges that will face scientists when they break the biggest news story in history.

Detecting a signal from an extraterrestrial intelligence would be life changing for everyone on Earth – the biggest news story in history – and could potentially be dangerous, especially if badly handled.

Writing in the journal Acta Astronautica, scientists at the Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) institute describe a protocol for how to break it to the world that we’re not alone in the Universe – without causing global mayhem.

cosmosmagazine.com/soc...

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Tbf I think the majority of people will embrace it, you’ll get the nutjobs outright refusing to believe it thinking it’s a conspiracy, you’ll get the religious fuckwits getting their brains in a twist trying to shoehorn it into their belief system.. I have to admit I look forward to that one.. others will be thinking Independence Day Fo Realz is coming and then you’ll get cunts like me and yourself takk who will absolutely be loving it.. just wish it would hurry up, the world could do with a little shake up like that

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I wonder what will come first, though. Some sort of signal/visual observation from a far away exoplanet, or microbial evidence within our own solar system, maybe a moon of Saturn or Jupiter, or even under the surface of Mars.

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Startup To Create Man-Made Meteor Shower For 2020 Olympics

For some countries, a massive pyrotechnic display would do, but not Japan. Japanese startup company Star-ALE wants to create a man-made meteor shower for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

The artificial meteor shower called Sky Canvas light show will allow viewers to enjoy it from an area of more than 120 miles.

And for that to happen, the pyrotechnics will not be set up on the ground. Star-ALE is taking it to space.

www.techtimes.com/arti...

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2016 Mercury Transit in 4K

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Sick

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It's surreal even thinking about humans discovering alien life and accepting it to be true, there's no other discovery or event you could compare it to it would just make people's head's explode

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It definitely would be the single biggest moment in human history just fucking hope it happens in my lifetime

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Would love to see it myself but they would never tell us

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They'll defs announce it if they find microbial life on mars but actual full blown alien species yeah I can see them holding onto that one for a while.

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they'll only hold onto it long enough for each government of the world to ready its statement to the general populace before a simultaneous worldwide release.. there would be no reason whatsoever to hold back something so momentous from the population

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bs.twimg.com/media/CkR...

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That is, without a doubt, the best Ireland from space photo, I've ever seen.

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Black hole to be seen for the first time ever with new computer algorithm

The picture of an event horizon will be ready in 2017, according to the team behind it

A team of scientists are hope to use a computer algorithm and a range of equipment to take the first ever picture of a black hole’s event horizon next year.

The picture will be taken by a project called Event Horizon Telescope – a network of nine radio telescopes placed all around the world.

www.independent.co.uk/...

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This is how colonies on other planets will be able to acquire tools and equipment, rather than having to have it shipped to them.

www.universetoday.com/...

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We Might Finally Solve the ‘Alien Megastructure’ Mystery

gizmodo.com/we-might-f...

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Tim Peake has given his first full news conference since touching down on the Kazakh steppe on Saturday.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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A STAR IS ABOUT TO GO 2.5% THE SPEED OF LIGHT PAST A BLACK HOLE

In 2018, the star will be at the closest point in its orbit to the Sagittarius A* – just 17 light-hours from it.

When it makes its closest approach, S2 will accelerate to speeds of almost 30 million km per hour, which is 2.5% the speed of light. Another opportunity to view this star reach such high speeds will not come again for another 16 years – in 2034. And having shown just how sensitive the instrument is already, the GRAVITY team expects to be able make very precise measurements of the star’s position.

In fact, they anticipate that the level of accuracy will be comparable to that of measuring the positions of objects on the surface of the Moon, right down to the centimeter-scale. As such, they will be able to determine whether the motion of the star as it orbits the black hole are consistent with Einstein’s theories of general relativity.

www.universetoday.com/...

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It’s hard to wrap your noggin around something as large as a star traveling at those speeds, the universe keeps throwing up these things of immense scale doing insanely cool shit, thank fuck we live in a relatively quiet corner can you image the havoc something like a star passing through a solar system at that speed would do, be cool to watch

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It's all relative, though. Like if you were on a planet which orbits that star, it may not even be noticeable. Although the stars in the sky would be cool looking the way they moved about so much.

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yeah i know but im talking about parking the ole spaceship just off to the side and watching the star and shockwave pass by...

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Only a few days until Juno reaches Jupiter. Going to be some amazing photos and data from it, all being well. Was listening to a podcast earlier and the radiation surrounding Jupiter that Juno has to deal with is equivalent to over 100 million X-rays, so it's electronics are deep inside the probe encased in a 1cm thick titanium box.

www.theguardian.com/sc...

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www.ustream.tv/channel...
www.wired.com/2016/07/...

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Can Gravitational Waves Let Us Peek Inside A Black Hole?

One of a black hole’s fundamental properties, of course, is that nothing can exit its event horizon from inside, since the escape velocity in a black hole’s interior is greater than the speed of light. But perhaps that can be overcome? Patreon supporter Robert J. Hansen wants to know if there’s a way of viewing what’s inside:

“If spacetime distortion can in effect boost the speed of light, is it possible for a passing gravitational wave to alter the event horizon of a black hole, giving us a way to observe the contents due to a temporary boosting of c?”

Let’s take a look at the physics and find out!

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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All you need to know about the Juno mission to Jupiter

With the Juno spacecraft now in orbit around the giant planet, this Cosmos video explains how it got there and what the mission hopes to achieve.

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Takk did you catch the latest Brian Cox show? Have yet to see it hoping it's as great as his other stuff

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Brian Cox is a great physicist, but I cant take him serious when he talks about theoretical stuff.

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you know what I mean?

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1337!

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No RJ. Has it started?

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he wore one of my favorite tshirts on his appearance on top gear the other night cementing my firm belief that we were meant to be together

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I believe so chap as i was in bed when the missus yelled up that my boyfriends new show was on telly

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haha.. Nice one. Just checked iPlayer and the first episode is indeed on there.

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#Hope

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The Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has spent the past five years building the telesccope, to the tune of 1.2-billion-yuan (180 million U.S. dollars). As the deputy head of the National Astronomical Observation, which is overseen by the CAS, Zheng Xiaonian was present at the celebrations marking the completion of the massive telescope.

As he was paraphrased as saying by the Xinhua News Agency: “The project has the potential to search for more strange objects to better understand the origin of the universe and boost the global hunt for extraterrestrial life.” Zheng was also quoted as saying that he expects FAST to be the global leader in radio astronomy for the next 10 to 20 years.

www.universetoday.com/...

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Exoplanet Found in Curious Triple-Star System

The newly discovered planet balances precariously in orbit within the star system, puzzling scientists.

A newfound exoplanet orbiting within a triple-star system has scientists scratching their heads.

Located some 340 light years from Earth, the gas giant called HD 131399Ab weighs in at about 4 times the mass of Jupiter, gets illuminated by not one but three stars, and takes 550 Earth years to complete one loop around its central star.

eos.org/articles/exopl...

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Venus, Not Earth, May Have Been Our Solar System's Best Chance At Life

If we were to wind the clock back some 4.5 billion years ago, to the early days of our Solar System, we would have seen a young, G-class star with four rocky worlds interior to our asteroid belt. Like many of the star systems the Kepler spacecraft has discovered, this type of configuration is relatively common; there are billions upon billions of chances in our galaxy alone that began just like ours did. But the young worlds in our newborn Solar System were very different from how they are today, and so was the Sun, for that matter.

Venus’ atmosphere was very thin at the beginning, comparable to the thickness of Earth’s atmosphere today. Earth, on the other hand, was very different, with lots of methane, ammonia, water vapor, hydrogen and virtually no oxygen at all. And the Sun was so faint compared to what it is now: less than 80% as luminous as it is today. With all that in mind, perhaps — if we rewound the Solar System to the very beginning and started it again — the ingredients for life would come together on Venus far more easily than on Earth? And perhaps early Venus was teeming with life, while things on Earth were barely getting started?

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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TFS wrong link

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"Here's What The Sun Looks Like From Every Planet In Our Solar System"

Our Solar System is a seriously beautiful place. Whether it’s the pockmarked volcanic surface of Mercury, the dusty crimson plains of Mars, the beautiful rings of Saturn, or even the blues and viridians of our own world, it’s a diverse place full of remarkable sights and natural wonders.

We’d be nowhere without the Sun, mind you, and a series of truly stunning visualizations of our local star – as seen from each planet, and poor demoted Pluto – by artist and illustrator Ron Miller serve to remind you of this fact. He’s spent more than 40 years illustrating the dark realms of space, both near and far, and has come up with the most realistic depictions of the Sun as seen from these far-flung worlds as possible.

www.iflscience.com/spa...

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