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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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nothing moves me quite like a shuttle launch. can't wait to be an astronaut.

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former one on the radio today explaining the emotions of the launch. the anticipation, the knot in your stomach, the adrenaline,the fear, the amazement.
similarities with a good old mushroom trip could not be more striking.

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lol

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Ground control to Major Tim.

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Take your protein pills and put your helmet on.

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Check ignition and may God's Love be with you.

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Mars moisture-farming mission gets approval for 2018 launch

Drink up. The first moisture farm on Mars will be part of a mission blasting off in 2018.

Earlier this year, Javier Martin-Torres of Luleå University of Technology in Kiruna, Sweden, and his colleagues reported results from NASA’s Curiosity rover suggesting that liquid water pools just beneath the surface of Mars at night before evaporating during the day.

The team has designed an instrument called HABIT to measure and test this process, and ESA has now approved its use on ExoMars, the joint mission between ESA and Russia to send a rover and lander to Mars in 2018.

HABIT will use salts to absorb 5 millilitres of water from the atmosphere a day, and it can hold up to 25 millilitres in total. That might not sound like much, but if the process works, it can easily be scaled up to provide water for future crewed missions to Mars, says Martin-Torres.

“HABIT can be easily adapted to ‘water-farms’ for in-situ resource production,” he says. “We will produce Martian liquid water on Mars, that could be used in the future exploration of Mars for astronauts and greenhouses.”

www.newscientist.com/a...

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Great BBC World Service Discovery podcast about Saturn’s moon Enceladus...

Discovery invites you on a mission to the most intriguing body in the solar system – Saturn’s moon Enceladus. It’s a small icy world with gigantic geysers, blasting water into space at supersonic speeds. It’s also become the most promising place among the planets to search for extra-terrestrial life. These astonishing discoveries come from Nasa’s Cassini mission to Saturn launched 18 years ago and still underway. The BBC’s Jonathan Amos talks to scientists who have been at the centre of the unfolding story of Enceladus and those who want to return to answer the great question which it poses.

Image Enceladus – credit: NASA/JPL/SSI Published on December 14, 2015.

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This image is mental. You can really see the beams of energy/light shining out through the dust and gas...

Hubble spies celestial lightsabre at heart of young star system

The Hubble Space Telescope has imaged a cosmic double-bladed lightsabre-like phenomenon emanating from the heart of a young star.

In a lighthearted gesture, the European Space Agency and NASA released images of the huge energised jets in time for the release of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens. But the star is not in a galaxy far, far away, but relatively nearby – at least in our own galaxy, the Milky Way.

More info: blog.cosmosmagazine.co...

Image: atic1.squarespace.com/...

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that looks pretty fucking cool.. how cool would it be to simply park a spaceship a safe distance away from one of these cosmic events and witness it in realtime.. fucking Einstein ruining it for us

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It'd be unreal. But not for us in our lifetimes, unfortunately.

Still, we do have VR just around the corner and constantly improving computing power. In 20 years time we could well sit and look at the next best view of crazy space phenomena and even things beyond the realm of reality. Not bad, IMO.

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Oh aye the virtual tech will get so good you'll be transported to anywhere you want but still :-(

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RJ, you're getting wile miserable in your old age.

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haha that wasnt sarcasm lad lol

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Video of its position in the sky...

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Tim Peake: Life in space is 'absolutely spectacular'

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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SpaceX release video of their Falcon 9 rocket coming back down to land...

www.facebook.com/Space...

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The ocean landing was always too ambitious to start with. Landing on land to start with is a good step forward. They'll eventually get the ocean landing too i think.

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Falcon 9 deploying satellites
gfycat.com/FeistyDecen...

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www.vox.com/2014/9/4/6...

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int.nyt.com.s3.amazona...

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Biggest galaxy vrs Milky way i.imgur.com/6Tp9g0S.jpg

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2016 preview for ESA

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A time-lapse photo captures the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch and landing.

cdn.theatlantic.com/as...

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The real reason NASA wants to find life on Mars

qz.com/583429/the-real...

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Curiosity's First Year On Mars In 2 Minutes | Time-Lapse Video

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TESS: A New Era of Exoplanet Discovery

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gizmodo.com/kepler-may...

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Hate reading about the problems of space missions. I'll be completely bricking it when JWST goes up.

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Famous Wow! signal might have been from comets, not aliens

www.newscientist.com/a...

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SpaceX releases new footage of last month’s rocket landing

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Imagine floating freely in space outside of the station. Totally amazing.

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and then a grain of sand hits you in the balls...

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The most powerful supernova blast ever seen

The most powerful stellar explosion ever seen — twice as powerful as anything previously recorded – has been detected by astronomers in a galaxy 3.8 billion light-years away.

The supernova named ASASSN-151h is 570 billion times brighter than our Sun, and 20 times brighter than all the stars in our Milky Way Galaxy combined. It is 200 times pas powerful as most supernovae.

Read more: blog.cosmosmagazine.co...

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Geeked out

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The Case of the So-Called Alien Megastructure Just Got Weirder

But according to a study just released arXiv, the comet hypothesis is now falling flat, too, and the mystery of KIC 8462852 has deepened considerably. While Kepler only has a few years of data on the star, astronomer Bradley Schaefer of Louisiana State University decided to look at photographic plates of the sky dating back to the late 19th century. To his amazement, he learned that over the last hundred years, KIC 8462852's light output has steadily faded by about 19%, something that’s “completely unprecedented for any F-type main sequence star.”

gizmodo.com/the-case-o...

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i.imgur.com/x6rgU1W.jpg

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lol at that last comment

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That person Ken M is a bit of a legendary troller, apparently. He pops up all over the internet just coming out with stuff like that.

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1200s

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