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Cool Space shit

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www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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Why We Should Land on Mars' Moon Before We Land on Mars

Rather than an expensive Apollo 8-style flyby or an audacious out-the-gates landing, NASA is mulling landing on the rocky, tiny moon first.

www.popularmechanics.c...

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Why Curiosity can't touch that Mars water

The second? Even if it could, it's not allowed to, according to a United Nations treaty written in 1967. The Outer Space Treaty, which lays out the rules for space exploration along the principles of mutual cooperation, states that exploration will be conducted in such a way as to avoid contamination from Earth life, Quartz reports.

"Because liquid water appears to be present, these regions are considered special regions where we have to take extra precautions to prevent contamination by earth life," explained Rich Zurek, a scientist on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter team, in a Reddit AMA session.

www.cnet.com/uk/news/w...

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Take a look at @MarsCuriosity's Tweet:

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Nasa and ESA target 'Didymoon' for asteroid deflection test

"Nasa and the European Space Agency are working together on a mission that will test their abilities to change the course of an asteroid by hitting it with a spacecraft. The target, nicknamed "Didymoon" by scientists, is a small natural satellite orbiting the asteroid Didymos."

"The primary goals of the Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission are "to test our ability to perform a spacecraft impact on a potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid and to measure and characterise the deflection caused by the impact."

www.wired.co.uk/news/a...

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Project Apollo Archive

1000's of HD negative scans of the Apollo missions uploaded by NASA...

www.flickr.com/photos/...

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Scientists Plan ‘Supersized Hubble’ To Get Answers on alien life

“When we imagine the landscape of astronomy in the decade of 2030, we realize it is at last within our grasp to make a monumental discovery that will change mankind forever. We hope to learn whether or not we are alone in the universe,”

The new space telescope, the High Definition Space Telescope (HDST), would have 100 times the capability to detect faint starlight than the Hubble. The proposal suggests the HDST would even surpass the “next generation space telescope,” the James Webb Space Telescope.

www.techmbob.com/alien...

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link not loading takki.. i assume this telescope can somehow detect and accurately image the atmosphere of distant planets cause unless we can do that with any degree of accuracy we'll be discovering feck all..

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Bit of a cross over between science and space...

www.computerworld.com/...

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Nasa Apollo mission photos uploaded online www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat...

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I love these old vids...

Bioastronautics Research c 1960 USAF Aerospace Medical Resarch Laboratory

Coverage of research at the Aerospace Medical Division Hq 6570th Aerospace Medical Research Laboratories, Dayton Ohio, including:

- scenes of F-104 ejection seat tests from C-130
- manned ejection seat firing from F-106 at 535 miles per hour
- effects of weightlessness on cats and pigeons in a C-131
- test subjects in water tank
- test subjects on centrifuge
- test subjects in heat chamber
- test subjects on complex coordination tester
- vertical deceleration tower
- incline impact test facility
- vertical accelerator
- equilibrium chair
- vibration platform

Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.

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SpaceX reportedly has big announcement in the works

www.sciencealert.com/s...

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Inside Saturn V.
Http://i.imgur.com/NAo...

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Takki I for one would love it if one of these so called "huge announcements" would actually be a huge fucking announcement, I want to be wowed not think ok cool... money is on a stargate

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motherboard.vice.com/r...

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Why Magnetars Should Freak You Out

www.space.com/30263-pa...

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“Aliens should always be the very last hypothesis you consider, but this looked like something you would expect an alien civilization to build.”
www.theatlantic.com/sc...
SMARM OF MEGASTRUCTURES

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NASA | Jupiter in 4k Ultra HD

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will watch that when i get home

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What's mad about that star with something strange orbiting it is that if it is alien life, we're seeing them as they were 1480 years ago. We're seeing them as they were when it was 535AD here. We've come on a huge way since then, especially recently. Knowledge and technology improving extremely rapidly, year on year from the turn on the 19th Century. Crazy to think how much more advanced an alien civilisation who were Type II civilisation on the Kardashev scale would have moved on in that time...

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Einstein practically ruined any chance for us to a: leave our solar system and b: contact or be contacted by an Alien civilisation outside our solar system... fucking physics

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Sounds like you've got yourself a nice wee dogma going there, RJ.
Einstein puts forward a theory, so that's it? End of messsage?
"Don't bother looking at it lads, you'll find it's all in order."

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that damned e=mc2 of his put the whole koboosh on the thing

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RJ has become really 'all-or-nothing' of late. Must be all the daily fail he's been absorbing. Rotting the brain.

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you cant break the laws of physics maaan

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People thought the world was flat. People thought the heavens were the realm of Gods. People thought that light travelled through an 'ether'. People thought the smallest thing was an atom.

People in the future could, and probably will, look back at our time and be amused at how little we know/what we think we know.

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yeah thats all fine and dandy but you ain't going past 99.99% of light speed which means we ain't getting anywhere near our closest neighbours upload.wikimedia.org/w... Voyager 1, which is now travelling 17.043 km/s (38,120 mph) relative to the Sun, would reach Proxima in 73,775 years, were the spacecraft traveling in the direction of that star. Nuclear pulse propulsion might enable such interstellar travel with a trip timescale of a century but were nowhere near that technologgy

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think about it, a probe going 38,000mph will take 73,775 years to reach our closest star...

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the fastest we've ever been able to achieve was 87,000mph using our gravity as a slingshot would still take 32,000 years to get there and those are small satellites..

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as soon as we get to the moon we'll be able to mine proper fuel rather than the approximately 470 w of 30 volt DC power voyager had when launched...

and as soon as space become more affordable and commercially viable that's where all the big money is going to go... why off shore you money when you can off planet it... it'll make more sense to design spacecraft than stock market algorithms

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We could launch from orbital space docks and use Jupiters immense gravitational forces to slingshot to incredible speeds using all sorts of crazy propulsion engines but your still not getting anywhere near light speed

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Conventional space travel is useless for deep space exploration we need to come up with exotic means of traversal like wormholes, folding space etc but that shit is pure science fiction

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Most of the Universe is already moving away from us faster than the speed of light. Just need to warp space/time. We may struggle to imagine how we could go about this, but can you imagine trying to explain to a scientist a couple of hundred years ago about going into space or to the moon? They couldn't comprehend it. You also may get killed for talking such demon tongue.

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Pluto at 80 miles i.imgur.com/wbRYWzw.jpg

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broadly.vice.com/en_us...

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Cassini is schedule to make a deep dive above the moon, passing just 30 miles from the world's south pole, possibly allowing it to sample bits of the ocean shot into space from a crack in the crust.

"During the encounter, Cassini will make its deepest-ever dive through the moon's plume of icy spray, sampling the chemistry of the extraterrestrial ocean beneath the ice," NASA said in the statement.

mashable.com/2015/10/1...

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imgur.com/EhOAsjv

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www.iflscience.com/spa...

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any more update on that female orgasm mushroom?

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Artist’s impression of the hottest and most massive touching double star

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This 46-Billion-Pixel View Of The Milky Way Is The Largest Space Image Ever Created

Astronomers have stitched together a high-resolution view of the Milky Way, which measures an astonishing 46 billion pixels and comes in at 194 gigabytes.

www.iflscience.com/spa...

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www.nytimes.com/2015/1...

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ys.org/news/2015-10-un...

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NASA's newest depiction of a Black Hole consuming a Star
i.imgur.com/3GpLLJL.gifv

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Titan and Enceladus with saturns rings infront of them
i.imgur.com/s6ZejdJ.jpg

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