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Cool Space shit

12

www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012...

Interesting to think that in the future when space flight has become the norm that history will look back on this little capsule as the moment space opened up to the rest of the world instead of a select few governments

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That's god's work boot

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Imagine that slamming into Earth at 34,000 mph.

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Imagine that slamming into Earth at 34,008 mph!

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Can't lad. I can't imagine anything past 34,000 mph. It's like a disability.

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Have put the Fear up my own bangle here

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10 Biggest Telescopes on Earth: How They Measure Up

www.space.com/14075-10...

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Scientists want you help crowdsource night lghts www.nbcnews.com/scienc...

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Clouds of methane forming over Titan - www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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This is a pretty amazing discovery!

www.iflscience.com/spa...

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no so cool space shit...

europe launches two satellites into wrong orbit:/
www.independent.co.uk/...

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landing spots on rosetta
www.newscientist.com/d...

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We Could Find Alien Life, But Politicians Don't Have The Will

www.iflscience.com/spa...

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www.nasa.gov/press/201...

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crazy to think Takki that the universe could be positively teeming with life given the fact that pretty much all stars have multiple planets with 1 or 2 within the habitable zone yet with the distance between stars being untraversable were all stuck on our own little rocks at various stages of technical evolution..

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motherboard.vice.com/r...

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Wheelsatellite

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our new address in the Laniakea supercluster of galaxies

bcove.me/1mzgnsnl

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Kevs fave website too...

Japan Is Launching An Asteroid Mining Space Program
www.businessinsider.co...

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video ain't loading for me Pav

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you should be able to access it here

www.space.com/27016-ga...

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8 Things We Can Do Now to Build a Space Colony This Century

io9.com/8-things-we-ca...

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Possible bright Aurora tonight folks...

www.belfasttelegraph.c...

of the back of this...

ys.org/news/2014-09-so...

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i.imgur.com/avvH5xw.jpg

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Rosetta comet chaser takes 'selfie' www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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These are brilliant!

www.independent.co.uk/...

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Astronomers Release Most Detailed Catalogue Ever Made of the Visible Milky Way

www.ing.iac.es/PR/pres...

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New Research Mathematically Proves Quantum Effects Stop the Formation of Black Holes

www.fromquarkstoquasar...

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wow - loid.gizmodo.com/short...

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Curious Signal Could Be Dark Matter Pouring From The Sun's Core

"This could be historic: Astronomers from Leicester University have detected a strange signal in the X-ray spectrum that appears to be a signature of 'axions' — a hypothetical dark matter particle. It could take years to confirm, but this may be the first direct detection and identification of dark matter."

Read more... io9.com/curious-signal...

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Spectacular comet will engulf Mars this Sunday in historical event

"This Sunday something historical will happen: An ancient rare comet will arrive to Mars after millions of years traveling at 33 miles per second from the Oort cloud. It will look like you can see above, passing just within a third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon, engulfing the Red Planet in its large tail."

loid.gizmodo.com/a-com...

Some more on this... www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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To Pluto … AND BEYOND!

www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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Stars, stars and more stars... www.robgendlerastropic...

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Info on that galaxy image above... www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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The Oldest Known Star in the Universe

Up until now, the oldest star that has had a reliable age measured for it is about 13.2 billion years old. It was already old when the Sun was just starting to fuse hydrogen into helium.

But astronomers have just published a paper about a star that is even more elderly: HD 140283, which appears to be 14.3 billion years old.

Now, before you start quoting that number for the next edition of the Guinness Book of Cosmic Records, you might want to note that the Universe itself is only 13.82 billion years old. Clearly, something must be off here.

www.slate.com/blogs/ba...

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This is absolutely brilliant.

Ambition the film:

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Uh oh... gizmodo.com/virgin-gal...

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The Warped Astrophysics of Interstellar

"What does Thorne see in there? He's an astrophysicist; his math guided the creation of this mesmerizing visual effect, the most accurate simulation ever of what a black hole would look like. It's the product of a year of work by 30 people and thousands of computers. And alongside a small galaxy of Hollywood stars—Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Bill Irwin, Casey Affleck, John Lithgow—the simulation plays a central role in Interstellar, the prestige space travel epic directed by Christopher Nolan opening November 7. Thorne sees truth. Nolan, the consummate image maker, sees beauty. Black holes, even fictional ones, can warp perception."

www.wired.com/2014/10/...

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that's a great wee piece. Cool that actually modelling the balck hole for a movie and expanded understanding of how they behave

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I cant wait to see it.

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360.autodesk.com/Publi... incredible high resolution photo of our planets to scale

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This is cool. A kinda warped perspective on the earth spinning.

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Great photo this one:

http://www.almaobservatory.org/images/newsreleases/141105_ALMA_HL_01.jpg

That's a photo taken of a distant solar system which is just forming (like ours did). More here

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Amazing. It's beautiful to think what you're actually looking at there.

I *really* hope all goes well with the James Webb Space Telescope. The images from it could well blow minds.

It's seven times more powerful than the Hubble Space Telescope and it will be able to detect planets around nearby stars by measuring infrared radiation, and it will even be able to measure the atmospheres of exoplanets by studying the starlight that passes through. By doing this it will be able to determine if an exoplanet has liquid water on its surface.

Q: You can see any sort of planets with that?

MM: Any planet that’s within 1 AU, like a habitable zone, or [farther] out.

John Grunsfeld (JG): James Webb is sold as studying galaxies, but I think its greatest discovery may be a habitable Earth-like exoplanet. That’s what’s going to blow everybody away.

Q: So you’d be able to directly image a terrestrial planet, which has never been done before?

JG: Exactly. But it wouldn’t be like a Rand McNally map, it would be a spot. But because you’d see a spot, we can then do a spectrum of that spot.

MM: You’d actually get a color. If it’s like Earth, it’ll look blue.

JG: And, if you had enough time, and there were seasons, with ice covering and then going away, you could study it and be able to tell the difference between winter and summer on the planet, or vegetation, in principle. Just from unresolved single pixels, because of the color changes.

MM: Or you could tell it is rotating.

- See more at: www.astrobio.net/inter...

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Great wee read... io9.com/is-it-time-to-...

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unfortunately it can't quite get us actual photos of the distant planets which would enable us to detect actual light sources on the planets surface and give us definitive proof

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It will be able to get actual images of exoplanets, RJ. They'll just be spot, but enough to get colour information and changes in colour. That is huge in itself.

Bear in mind, it hasn't really been that long since we've been able to get images of earth from orbit with enough resolution and quality to be able to pick out city lights, etc.

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Astronauts Submerge a GoPro Inside a Floating Ball of Water On The ISS

www.iflscience.com/ast...

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you'd think they would be chasing thos tiny droplets of water about trying to dry them up, as it might short something out, what with them being in space and all that.

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RJ, think you were asking about time dilation on the surface of the sun. Just reading a bit about Interstellar and the time dilation in that and the article says "If you visited the surface of our sun, which is not a supermassive body but still much more massive than Earth, you would gain about 66 seconds per year." - Dr Roberto Trotta (@R_Trotta) is senior lecturer in astrophysics at Imperial College London.

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