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Cool science shit

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blogs.technet.com/b/ne... would love this as a coffee table

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Gaining Useful Knowledge from a Tragic Event

eos.org/project-update...

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www.csmonitor.com/Scie...

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The world's most efficient and environment-friendly solar cells

Researchers are currently developing the environment-friendly solar cells of the future, which will capture twice as much energy as the cells of today. The trick is to combine two different types of solar cells in order to utilize a much greater portion of the sunlight.

"These are going to be the world's most efficient and environment-friendly solar cells. There are currently solar cells that are certainly just as efficient, but they are both expensive and toxic. Furthermore, the materials in our solar cells are readily available in large quantities on Earth. That is an important point," says Professor Bengt Svensson of the Department of Physics at the University of Oslo (UiO) and Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology (SMN).

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-03-wo...

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Drug 'reverses' ageing in animal tests - www.bbc.co.uk/news/hea...

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Japanese company develops a solar cell with record-breaking 26%+ efficiency

A group of researchers funded by a Japanese government program develops “industrially compatible” cells.

arstechnica.com/scienc...

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tคккเรςђเtt • 9 hours, 59 minutes ago
Japanese company develops a solar cell with record-breaking 26%+ efficiency

somewhere deep in slumber a doombadger stirred...

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lol think he's moved on to selling home disco lighting these days

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Inside a Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector

Why is there more matter than antimatter in the Universe? To better understand this facet of basic physics, energy departments in China and the USA led in the creation of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Located under thick rock about 50 kilometers northeast of Hong Kong, China, eight Daya Bay detectors monitor antineutrinos emitted by six nearby nuclear reactors. Featured here, a camera looks along one of the Daya Bay detectors, imaging photon sensors that pick up faint light emitted by antineutrinos interacting with fluids in the detector. Early results indicate an unexpectedly high rate of one type of antineutrino changing into another, a rate which, if confirmed, could imply the existence of a previously undetected type of neutrino as well as impact humanity's comprehension of fundamental particle reactions that occurred within the first few seconds of the Big Bang.

apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap1...

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Spinach leaf turned into heart tissue
news.nationalgeographi...

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The Search for a Genetic Disease Cure

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Physicists Say They've Created a Fluid With 'Negative Mass'

Researchers in the US say they've created a fluid with negative mass in the lab... which is exactly as mind-bending as it sounds.

What it means is that, unlike pretty much every other known physical object, when you push this fluid, it accelerates backwards instead of moving forwards. Such an oddity could tell scientists about some of the strange behaviour that happens within black holes and neutron stars.

www.sciencealert.com/p...

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Computers Create Recipe for Two New Magnetic Materials

First supercomputer-generated recipes yield two new kinds of magnets

Material scientists have predicted and built two new magnetic materials, atom-by-atom, using high-throughput computational models. The success marks a new era for the large-scale design of new magnetic materials at unprecedented speed.

ratt.duke.edu/about/ne...

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South Indian frog oozes molecule that inexplicably decimates flu viruses

"A compound in the frog’s mucus—long known to have germ-killing properties—can latch onto flu virus particles and cause them to burst apart, researchers report in Immunity. The peptide is a potent and precise killer, able to demolish a whole class of flu viruses while leaving other viruses and cells unharmed. But scientists don’t know exactly how it pulls off the viral eviscerations. No other antiviral peptide of its ilk seems to work the same way."

arstechnica.co.uk/scie...

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Signs From The March For Science

www.sadanduseless.com/...

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www.eurekalert.org/pub...

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Spying on Wildlife With Animal Robots

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Tesla battery researcher unveils new chemistry to increase lifecycle at high voltage
electrek.co/2017/05/04...

Tesla battery researcher says they doubled lifetime of batteries in Tesla’s products 4 years ahead of time
electrek.co/2017/05/09...

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Scientists Achieve Direct Counterfactual Quantum Communication For The First Time

Theoretical physicists have long proposed that such a form of communication would be possible, but now, for the first time, researchers have been able to experimentally achieve it - transferring a black and white bitmap image from one location to another without sending any physical particles.

www.sciencealert.com/s...

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Smartphones that charge in five minutes 'could arrive next year' - www.bbc.co.uk/news/tec...

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Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa, scientists find www.telegraph.co.uk/sc... erm... this is kinda big is it not

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Is it? I dunno, weren't Africa and Europe still one continent 7 million years ago?

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www.japantimes.co.jp/n...

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One billion suns: World's brightest laser sparks new behavior in light

"Physicists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln are seeing an everyday phenomenon in a new light.

By focusing laser light to a brightness one billion times greater than the surface of the sun - the brightest light ever produced on Earth - the physicists have observed changes in a vision-enabling interaction between light and matter.

Under typical conditions, as when light from a bulb or the sun strikes a surface, that scattering phenomenon makes vision possible. But an electron - the negatively charged particle present in matter-forming atoms - normally scatters just one photon of light at a time. And the average electron rarely enjoys even that privilege, Umstadter said, getting struck only once every four months or so."

ys.org/news/2017-06-bi...

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NASA completes milestone toward quieter supersonic X-plane

"NASA has achieved a significant milestone in its effort to make supersonic passenger jet travel over land a real possibility by completing the preliminary design review (PDR) of its Quiet Supersonic Transport or QueSST aircraft design. QueSST is the initial design stage of NASA's planned Low Boom Flight Demonstration (LBFD) experimental airplane, otherwise known as an X-plane.

Senior experts and engineers from across the agency and the Lockheed Martin Corporation concluded Friday that the QueSST design is capable of fulfilling the LBFD aircraft's mission objectives, which are to fly at supersonic speeds, but create a soft "thump" instead of the disruptive sonic boom associated with supersonic flight today. The LBFD X-plane will be flown over communities to collect data necessary for regulators to enable supersonic flight over land in the United States and elsewhere in the world."

ys.org/news/2017-06-na...

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homemade lava flows
eos.org/articles/homem...

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*"homemade"

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The first high-speed colour video from the COMPASS tokamak

"On 20th January 2016, the first high-speed colour videos from the COMPASS tokamak discharges were recorded by a new fast CMOS camera of the Photron Mini UX100 type. In ohmically heated plasmas in a divertor configuration and deuterium as a working gas, the videos of 1000-20000 frames per second revealed formation of the plasma column, its shaping and refilling by the gas puffing, and also a plasma-wall interaction resulting in dust particles propagating across the vacuum vessel of the tokamak."

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Can faster-than-light particles explain dark matter, dark energy, and the Big Bang?

"The answer, according to a paper published in European Physical Journal C by Herb Fried from Brown University and Yves Gabellini from INLN-Université de Nice, may be a kind of particle called a tachyon.

Tachyons are hypothetical particles that travel faster than light. According to Einstein’s special theory of relativity – and according to experiment so far – in our ‘real’ world, particles can never travel faster than light. Which is just as well: if they did, our ideas about cause and effect would be thrown out the window, because it would be possible to see an effect manifest before its cause."

cosmosmagazine.com/phy...

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Computer scientists use wave packet theory to develop realistic, detailed water wave simulations in real time

Think about the last time you were at a lake, river, or the ocean. Remember the ripples of the water, the waves crashing against the rocks, the wake following a boat, the sun reflecting off the crests? Amazingly, the mathematical equations describing many of these phenomena have been known for over a hundred years. The trouble is, actually solving them is extremely difficult and costly, making accurate, realistic simulations a significant problem for computer scientists, visual artists, and others. Now, computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and Nvidia have introduced a novel representation of waves that improves computational efficiency by at least an order of magnitude. Based on principles of theoretical physics, their method allows for significantly more visual detail as well as a greater degree of user control.

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-07-sc...

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Like little rings of Saturn: How electricity pulls a drop of liquid apart

What happens when you put a drop of liquid in an electric field? That’s no idle inquiry to occupy boffins on their lunch break. The outcome has very real implications for a range of important applications, from nanotechnology to spacecraft design. It’s a question that has been open since at least the 16th century, when the English naturalist William Gilbert noticed that a piece of charged amber could make a water droplet change its shape. some of the answers are today used everywhere from nanotechnology to spacecraft.

Until recently, scientists thought they had the question more or less sorted: depending on a few variables, the drop might change its shape or spin around or, most dramatically it might spray electrically charged droplets out the ends.

Now, however, a pair of American researchers have achieved a surprising new result – one that pulls a liquid drop apart, making it extrude tiny rings from its equator that in turn break up into micro-droplets. The formation of these “Saturn rings” has never been seen before. “This might seem like a rather intuitive way [for a drop] to decay,” says one of the researchers, Quentin Brosseau, “but this is to our knowledge the only occurrence.”

cosmosmagazine.com/phy...

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Anumeric’ people: What happens when a language has no words for numbers?

"Numbers do not exist in all cultures. There are numberless hunter-gatherers embedded deep in Amazonia, living along branches of the world’s largest river tree. Instead of using words for precise quantities, these people rely exclusively on terms analogous to “a few” or “some.”

In contrast, our own lives are governed by numbers. As you read this, you are likely aware of what time it is, how old you are, your checking account balance, your weight and so on. The exact (and exacting) numbers we think with impact everything from our schedules to our self-esteem.

But, in a historical sense, numerically fixated people like us are the unusual ones. For the bulk of our species’ approximately 200,000-year lifespan, we had no means of precisely representing quantities. What’s more, the 7,000 or so languages that exist today vary dramatically in how they utilize numbers.

Speakers of anumeric, or numberless, languages offer a window into how the invention of numbers reshaped the human experience. In a new book, I explore the ways in which humans invented numbers, and how numbers subsequently played a critical role in other milestones, from the advent of agriculture to the genesis of writing."

cosmosmagazine.com/mat...

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First battery-free cellphone makes calls by harvesting ambient power

"University of Washington researchers have invented a cellphone that requires no batteries—a major leap forward in moving beyond chargers, cords and dying phones. Instead, the phone harvests the few microwatts of power it requires from either ambient radio signals or light.

The team also made Skype calls using its battery-free phone, demonstrating that the prototype made of commercial, off-the-shelf components can receive and transmit speech and communicate with a base station."

ys.org/news/2017-07-ba...

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200,000 TB!

CERN Data Centre passes the 200-petabyte milestone

"On 29 June 2017, the CERN DC passed the milestone of 200 petabytes of data permanently archived in its tape libraries. Where do these data come from? Particles collide in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detectors approximately 1 billion times per second, generating about one petabyte of collision data per second. However, such quantities of data are impossible for current computing systems to record and they are hence filtered by the experiments, keeping only the most "interesting" ones. The filtered LHC data are then aggregated in the CERN Data Centre (DC), where initial data reconstruction is performed, and where a copy is archived to long-term tape storage. Even after the drastic data reduction performed by the experiments, the CERN DC processes on average one petabyte of data per day. This is how the the milestone of 200 petabytes of data permanently archived in its tape libraries was reached on 29 June."

ys.org/news/2017-07-ce...

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www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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Indestructible tardigrades will live until the dying Sun boils Earth’s oceans

This resilient species can withstand extreme conditions including 150-degree heat, pressure six times what you find in an ocean trench, and up to 30 years without food or water – all of which which will aid their survival.

To assess this resilience, scientists at Oxford and Harvard Universities zeroed in on three kinds of potential astrophysical events: asteroid impacts, gamma ray bursts, and exploding stars in the form of supernovae. Their results are published in Scientific Reports.

They deduced that to kill off tardigrades, an astrophysical event would need to pack enough punch to boil Earth’s oceans. This means a hefty asteroid, a supernova within 0.14 light-years of Earth, or a gamma-ray that burst no more than 40 light-years away.

None of these situations are particularly probable – our closest asteroids and stars aren’t big enough to achieve these outcomes. As a result, the research suggests tardigrades will live through any major astrophysical impact likely to occur on Earth, potentially giving them another 5 billion years of life.

cosmosmagazine.com/bio...

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What is Deep Learning and how does it work?

"Facebook automatically finds and tags friends in your photos. Google Deepmind’s AlphaGo computer program trounced champions at the ancient game of Go last year. Skype translates spoken conversations in real time – and pretty accurately too.

Behind all this is a type of artificial intelligence called deep learning. But what is deep learning and how does it work?"

cosmosmagazine.com/tec...

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Worldwide 100% renewable energy possible by 2050, claims detailed new plan

"A detailed roadmap for 139 countries outlines a path to a future powered entirely by wind, water and solar energy."

cosmosmagazine.com/tec...

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Bye Cassini!

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wouldnt it been class to get a 1080p video of that dissent

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ffs descent

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P-hacking...
Hack Your Way To Scientific Glory

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Google’s quantum computing plans threatened by IBM curveball

"Just when it was looking like the underdog, classical computing is striking back. IBM has come up with a way to simulate quantum computers that have 56 quantum bits, or qubits, on a non-quantum supercomputer – a task previously thought to be impossible. The feat moves the goalposts in the fight for quantum supremacy, the effort to outstrip classical computers using quantum ones.

It used to be widely accepted that a classical computer cannot simulate more than 49 qubits because of memory limitations. The memory required for simulations increases exponentially with each additional qubit.

The closest anyone had come to putting the 49-qubit limit to a test was a 45-qubit simulation at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, which needed 500 terabytes of memory. IBM’s new simulation upends the assumption by simulating 56 qubits with only 4.5 terabytes."

www.newscientist.com/a...

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Runs a billion times slower than a 56 qubit quantum computer equivalent would do. Why even bother?

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I don't think they're building it to compete directly, but it will be good to have something which they can run tests on, develop ideas/software on and practice data handling for if/when quantum computers become (more) viable. They'll be able to integrate other systems/hardware alongside it better to also test how 'standard' systems will be able to interact with quantum systems.

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link for my rather gnomic post from a few days ago

rojects.fivethirtyeigh...

and the article
fivethirtyeight.com/fe...

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www.rt.com/document/59...

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Why The Netherlands Isn't Under Water

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love that dudes channel

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