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Cool science shit

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blogs.technet.com/b/ne... would love this as a coffee table

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This is pretty huge.

CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time

A Chinese group has become the first to inject a person with cells that contain genes edited using the revolutionary CRISPR–Cas9 technique.

On 28 October, a team led by oncologist Lu You at Sichuan University in Chengdu delivered the modified cells into a patient with aggressive lung cancer as part of a clinical trial at the West China Hospital, also in Chengdu.

Earlier clinical trials using cells edited with a different technique have excited clinicians. The introduction of CRISPR, which is simpler and more efficient than other techniques, will probably accelerate the race to get gene-edited cells into the clinic across the world, says Carl June, who specializes in immunotherapy at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and led one of the earlier studies.

"I think this is going to trigger ‘Sputnik 2.0’, a biomedical duel on progress between China and the United States, which is important since competition usually improves the end product,” he says.

Read more: www.nature.com/news/cr...

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Terminally ill teen won historic ruling to preserve body

A 14-year-old girl who wanted her body to be preserved, in case she could be cured in the future, won a historic legal fight shortly before her death. The girl, who was terminally ill with a rare cancer, was supported by her mother in her wish to be cryogenically preserved - but not by her father.

She wrote to the judge explaining that she wanted "to live longer" and did not want "to be buried underground". The girl, who died in October, has been taken to the US and preserved there.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/hea...

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such a sad story that but fair play to her

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thon Crispr thing has the potential to be some proper next level shit

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Yeah, it's pretty unbelievable and fascinating. The possibilities are crazy, and potentially terrifying.

I've never really had that much of an interest in biology, but cant get enough of CRISPR info. Was listening to a podcast the other day and apparently there's a bit of a melty legal battle going on around it, which is putting a bit of a dampener on things:

echcrunch.com/2016/11/...

www.statnews.com/2016/...

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Gap in Research Funding Holds Back Potential Cure for All Viruses

When Dr. Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928, it changed the course of human history, improving our lives in ways that we cannot even imagine. Before, simple infections and wounds could turn deadly and childhood diseases were something much feared. Unfortunately, other than suppressing replication, there is no viral equivalent. Nothing that we know of can destroy viruses outright, other than the immune system itself. That is perhaps, until now.

Dr. Todd Rider, a science prodigy from MIT, discovered a method of destroying practically any virus inside the body. Rider hasn’t invented a way to kill viruses outright, exactly. Instead, he has devised a drug which can locate and destroy cells infected with viruses, before they have a chance to replicate. The drug is known as DRACO (double-stranded RNA activated caspase oligomerizers). Not only does it eliminate infected cells, it leaves healthy ones alone.

Theoretically, it should be able to take out any virus, according to Rider. So far, DRACO has proven effective against 15 of the world’s most notorious viruses including H1N1, dengue fever, polio, the norovirus—which causes stomach flu, and more.

bigthink.com/philip-pe...

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New understanding of metastability clears path for next-generation materials

They say diamonds are forever, but diamonds in fact are a metastable form of carbon that will slowly but eventually transform into graphite, another form of carbon. Being able to design and synthesize other long-lived, thermodynamically metastable materials could be a potential gold mine for materials designers, but until now, scientists lacked a rational understanding of them.

Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have published a new study that, for the first time, explicitly quantifies the thermodynamic scale of metastability for almost 30,000 known materials. This paves the way for designing and making promising next-generation materials for use in everything from semiconductors to pharmaceuticals to steels.

"There's a great amount of possibility in the space of metastable materials, but when experimentalists go to the lab to make them, the process is very heuristic—it's trial and error," said Berkeley Lab researcher Wenhao Sun. "What we've done in this research is to understand the metastable phases that have been made, so that we can better understand which metastable phases can be made."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2016-11-me...

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I forgot, first quantum mechanics go in here. Anyway, prepare to have your mind blown. 3tags.org/article/the-...

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* does quantum mechanics

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Nevermind Moore’s Law: Transistors Just Got A Whole Lot Smaller

Transistors are semiconductors that work as the building blocks of modern computer hardware. Already very small, smaller transistors are an important part of improving computer technology. That’s what a team from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory managed to do, according to a study published in the journal Science.

Current transistors in use are in 14nm scale technology, with 10nm semiconductors expected in 2017 or 2018, supposedly in Intel’s Cannonlake line — a trend following Intel co-founder Gordon Moore’s prediction that transistor density on integrated circuits would double every two years, improving computer electronics.

Berkeley Lab’s team seems to have beaten them into it, developing a functional 1nm transistor gate.

futurism.com/nevermind...

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Will get a read at that on lunch, mm.

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How Physics Falls Apart If The EMdrive Works

"Imagine a rocket that works without fuel. You pump energy into it and away you go, but there’s no thrust coming out the other side, no exhaust, no waste product and no consumable fuel. It’s the ultimate defiance of Isaac Newton: claiming to have an action without an equal and opposite reaction. And yet, inventor of the EMdrive, Roger Shawyer, claims to do exactly that. Not only does he say that his device works, he claims that anyone can build one and verify it for themselves. At Eagleworks laboratory, NASA scientists attempted to do exactly that, and just published their findings in a peer-reviewed journal. The results? They verify that the EMdrive works as advertised."

www.forbes.com/sites/s...

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some craic thon EM Drive, has plenty of potential once you get it up into space mind

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Theory that challenges Einstein's physics could soon be put to the test

m.phys.org/news/2016-1...

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lol at this comment on the articl
"RICK BAARTMAN 2 days ago

Seriously? A result that is uncertain to the level of plus or minus 50% is quoted to 5 significant figures? And it passed peer review?"

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Cool as fuck

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Linear reciprocation to rotation conversion

i.imgur.com/Ccf2kN5.gif

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Thats the move i do with yer ma

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Thats some nice precision engineering

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Science is fanny central, claims Brian Cox

TOP scientists are nailing a load of fanny, according to dance-pop physicist Brian Cox.

The TV professor believes there is still a preconception that science experts are unlikely to enjoy large amounts of debauched consequence-free sex with saucy girls from every corner of the globe.

Professor Cox said: “The amount of fanny I’m getting is mental.

“And I say that as someone who’s used to thinking of things on a quantum scale. Seriously, I’m quite at home with the vastness of the universe, time, space etc. but if I start thinking about the sheer volume of hairy pie I’m tucking into, it properly does my head in."

www.thedailymash.co.uk...

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LIGO black hole echoes hint at general-relativity breakdown

Gravitational-wave data show tentative signs of firewalls or other exotic physics.

www.nature.com/news/li...

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^ should be in space thread

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Scientists have created a tiny crystal that can turn darkness into light

www.sciencealert.com/s...

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The planet is warming at an unprecedented rate, and reducing emissions of greenhouse gases alone is not enough to remove the risk.

Last year’s historic Paris climate agreement set the goal of keeping global temperatures no higher than 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. Emission reductions will be central to achieving that goal, but supplemental efforts can further reduce risks.

One drastic idea is solar geoengineering — injecting light-reflecting sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere to cool the planet. Researchers know that large amounts of aerosols can significantly cool the planet; the effect has been observed after large volcanic eruptions. But these sulfate aerosols also carry significant risks. The biggest known risk is that they produce sulfuric acid in the stratosphere, which damages ozone. Since the ozone layer absorbs ultraviolet light from the sun, its depletion can lead to increased rates of skin cancer, eye damage, and other adverse consequences.

Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have identified an aerosol for solar geoengineering that may be able to cool the planet while simultaneously repairing ozone damage.

news.harvard.edu/gazet...

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www.reddit.com/r/Futur...

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Trillions of high-flying migratory insects cross over UK - www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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New Ebola vaccine shows 100% effectiveness in a study of nearly 6,000 patients (p-value 0.0033)

www.thelancet.com/jour...

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Crazy sounds!

Scientists have identified that mysterious, metallic sound coming from the Mariana Trench

www.sciencealert.com/s...

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It's Not Cold Fusion... But It's Something

An experiment that earned Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann widespread ridicule in 1989 wasn't necessarily bogus

blogs.scientificameric...

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"New technology has been developed that uses nuclear waste to generate electricity in a nuclear-powered battery. A team of physicists and chemists from the University of Bristol have grown a man-made diamond that, when placed in a radioactive field, is able to generate a small electrical current.

Despite their low-power, relative to current battery technologies, the life-time of these diamond batteries could revolutionise the powering of devices over long timescales. Using carbon-14 the battery would take 5,730 years to reach 50 per cent power, which is about as long as human civilization has existed."

ys.org/news/2016-11-di...

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Inside tiny tubes, water turns solid when it should be boiling

MIT researchers discover astonishing behavior of water confined in carbon nanotubes.

"It’s a well-known fact that water, at sea level, starts to boil at a temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit, or 100 degrees Celsius. And scientists have long observed that when water is confined in very small spaces, its boiling and freezing points can change a bit, usually dropping by around 10 C or so.

But now, a team at MIT has found a completely unexpected set of changes: Inside the tiniest of spaces — in carbon nanotubes whose inner dimensions are not much bigger than a few water molecules — water can freeze solid even at high temperatures that would normally set it boiling.

The discovery illustrates how even very familiar materials can drastically change their behavior when trapped inside structures measured in nanometers, or billionths of a meter. And the finding might lead to new applications — such as, essentially, ice-filled wires — that take advantage of the unique electrical and thermal properties of ice while remaining stable at room temperature."

news.mit.edu/2016/carb...

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Interesting stuff. Top linkage Takki.

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Bit of a spamfest! They're some of the ones I was reading about on hols that I thought were pretty interesting, so emailed them to myself to fire on here/Facebook when I got home.

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A Few Billionaires Are Turning Medical Philanthropy on Its Head

"Sean Parker decided to take on cancer by throwing so many deep-rooted basics of research tradition out the window that he very nearly drove away the academics he wanted to attract.

Among the many curious things about the institute established in April by Parker, Facebook Inc.’s first president and a co-founder of Napster Inc., is that scientists must pledge to collaborate instead of compete and to concentrate on making drugs rather than publishing papers. What’s more, marketable discoveries will be group affairs, with collaborative licensing deals -- no matter who led the research.

Many of the top cancer specialists who met in San Francisco to hear Parker’s pitch three years ago were flummoxed as he explained profits would be distributed among all the institutions, though main inventors would get bigger shares and the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy would take a cut as well. More than a few in the room at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel just couldn’t track how it would work.

“People were thinking, ‘Was this for real? Are you trying to make money?’ ” said Jeffrey Bluestone, the institute’s chief executive officer and an immunology researcher at the University of California at San Francisco. It was too against the grain for some, but now there are more than 300 researchers on board and clinical trials are underway."

Read more: www.bloomberg.com/news...

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Good to have you back, takki. The science thread has been quiet lately. That's my pre sleep reading sorted for tonight.

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A Completely New Human Organ Has Just Been Officially Discovered

"Writing in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, scientists have officially announced the discovery of a new organ inside the human body. That’s right, there’s a brand new organ hiding in our abdomen and it’s only just been classified.

Known as the mesentery (meaning “in the middle of the intestines”), it can be found in our digestive systems. Leonardo da Vinci actually gave one of the first descriptions of it back in the day, but until around 2012 it was thought to be a series of separate structures keeping the intestines attached to the abdominal wall, like a series of support girders.

A team from the University of Limerick, however, used complex microscopy work to confirm that the structures are all interconnected and appear to be part of one overall structure. Much of the research was conducted on patients undergoing an operation to remove most or all of their colon."

www.iflscience.com/hea...

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moth drives car
www.sciencemag.org/new...

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Why the fuck does it need a car.

"drivers, the insects piloted the vehicle consistently toward the pheromones, nearly as well as 10 other silkworm moths who could walk freely on the ground toward the smells"

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Why do any of us need cars?

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To pick up chicks

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This is cool. See how the earth looked at various times through ancient history - dinosaurpictures.org/a...

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Could Technology Remove the Politicians From Politics?

"The tech industry has talked long and hard about democratizing industries. Democratizing content, democratizing taxi-cabs, and democratizing bed and breakfasts. But what about democratizing democracy?

What if your city council member was an empty vessel whose every decision you voted for on your smartphone?

So rather than electing a representative to vote in their district’s interest bill by bill, those district members, using that secure token, and perhaps a system like the blockchain, could each cast votes on issues in their district.

Which is to say that rather than voting on a human to represent us from afar, we could vote directly, issue-by-issue, on our smartphones, cutting out the cash pouring into political races, and embodying the highest ideals inscribed in our founding documents regarding the "will of the People."

Read more - motherboard.vice.com/e...

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not sure if been posted before but Just How Big Can a Tsunami Get? www.gizmodo.co.uk/2017... i mean holy fuck these would've been incredible to have witnessed

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Tsunami's are incredible forces of nature. That father/son who ended up surfing that one in Alaska. Legends.

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Microscopic Time-Lapse: See the Crazy Chemistry of Reacting Metal | Short Film Showcase

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Physicists detect exotic looped trajectories of light in three-slit experiment

"Physicists have performed a variation of the famous 200-year-old double-slit experiment that, for the first time, involves "exotic looped trajectories" of photons. These photons travel forward through one slit, then loop around and travel back through another slit, and then sometimes loop around again and travel forward through a third slit."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2017-01-ph...

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Scientists have cooled an object beyond the icy limits of known physics

"For the first time, physicists have cooled a mechanical object to a temperature colder than previously thought possible, taking it below the so-called "quantum limit" and bending the laws of physics.

Using a new technique, the team managed to chill a microscopic mechanical drum to an unheard-of 360 microKelvin, or 10,000 times colder than the vacuum of space. It's the coldest mechanical object on record."

www.sciencealert.com/s...

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The EM Drive: Fact or Fantasy?

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What if NASA had the US Military's Budget?

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