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Cool science shit

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blogs.technet.com/b/ne... would love this as a coffee table

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gizmodo.com/rumors-are...

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interesting eyes and odd dramatic music

www.sciencemag.org/new...

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www.washingtonpost.com...

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Love hearing about these wee legends...

Water bear frozen alive and re-animated 30 years later

blog.cosmosmagazine.co...

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New Werner Herzog Documentary coming out about AI and Robotics.

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motherboard.vice.com/r...

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www.wired.com/2016/01/...

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www.bbc.co.uk/news/hea...

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Germany's Fusion Reactor Creates Hydrogen Plasma In World First

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Germany have successfully conducted a revolutionary nuclear fusion experiment. Using their experimental reactor, the Wendelstein 7-X (W7X) stellarator, they have managed to sustain a hydrogen plasma – a key step on the path to creating workable nuclear fusion.

www.iflscience.com/phy...

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China's nuclear fusion machine just smashed Germany's hydrogen plasma record

www.sciencealert.com/c...

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Good to see the Chinese get in on it as they'll throw almost unlimited funds at it to be a first and that's the sort of competition we need

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Only thing about the Chinese is they can be quite secretive about research and findings.

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only in matters of national security, sure there building thon massive radio telescope in southern china and have already stated that it'll be open to science i dont see them keeping clean energy a secret either.. they'll want to shout that one to the world, they've lagged behind in science for decades and now want to be leaders

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Remember after Tohuko earthquake (Fukashima)... and all the talk of sunspots shaped like Japan causing the earthquake?

RonanPeter (who I assume is RP.com) asked me about the gravitational effects of the sun and planets influencing the occurrence of earthquake.

Turns out it does...

gji.oxfordjournals.org...

Interesting science but a bit of a read

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The 2 most dangerous numbers in the Universe could signal the end of physics

www.sciencealert.com/t...

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Gravitational waves announcement: Scientists confirm detection of ripples in spacetime

"Scientists say that the discovery is the biggest of the century — far more important than that of the Higgs boson"

www.independent.co.uk/...

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"It was the equivalent of taking three stars, each the size of the Sun, and annihilating them into pure energy."

Arcane. Must be some level of a spellcaster to do that.

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What are the possibilities aside from exploring space and big bang etc. Can we turn this into a weapon?

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Takki. Don't worry about breaking the laws of physics. Mainly because the universe is a hologram, constructed by an entity to simulate their universe. *Drops the mic*

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big time. mad hearing these scientists get exited over something the Greys in Roswell are drip-feeding the lizard overkings so your shitty little 3d heads don't explode.

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“The total power output of gravitational waves during the brief collision was 50 times greater than all of the power put out by all the of the stars in the universe put together,” said Kip Thorne of Caltech, one of LIGO’s founders. “It’s unbelievable.”

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Ayeeeee right. KIP IS YOUR REAL NAME IS IT?

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imgur.com/WY4keW6.jpg

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"Two enormous black holes (one 36 times the mass of the Sun, the other 29 times), snared in each others’ gravitational pull, spiralled towards each other and finally merged to produce a single black hole."

"But the single black hole weighed only 62 times that of the Sun – the remaining three Suns’ worth of mass was converted to pure energy. According to Einstein’s famous energy-mass equivalence equation E = mc2, this equals around 5.4x1047 joules, or 8.5 billion trillion trillion Hiroshima atomic bombs."

8500000000000000000000000000000000

Mind boggling.

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good introduction video to gravitational waves and their discovery

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crazy how they detected such a small wave... yer mawn Einstein was one smart cookie.. probably give aul pav a run for his money

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lets not get ahead of ourselves here RJ.

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well they did release a statement saying they detected it...

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I was referring to Einstein givimg me a run for my money... the guy never even used a computer. +1 to Pavlov

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A fitting way to mark his genius that 100 years after his theory it gets proven. that level of thinking is hectic even thinking about having never mind doing.

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Physics was easier back in his day though. If a train moves at 30mph and you chuck a ball in the air what speed is it going at type stuff. Anything these days is all multi universe star trek shit. Emperiments were all done on a tabletop too. Nowdays its a £100billion tube underground.

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*digs out golf ball*

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You just need that to generate the data, CleanDirty... if you can access the data, many experiments can be done now from a coffee shop with a good internet connection

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Poor Einstein never had a starbucks to sit in and look pretentious with his laptop.

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lol@ looking pretentious when sciencing the shit out of the universe

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a coffee shop

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los-temblores.blogspot...

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What was your thesis on, pav?

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"Using a genetic algorithm to estimate earthquake slip distributions from point surface displacement"

Don't know if that or this will make too much sense but:
The growth of corals around Sumatra are affected by changes in sea level... and for the most part theses are caused by the tectonic motion. Evidence of when the earthquake happened and how big it is is recorded in their growth rings (kind of like trees rings),- that is the point surface displacement

You can calculate how much the earth moved (i.e. the level of slip) to produce a certain amount of vertical displacement. Because the corals record extends over hundreds of years it means it is possible to estimate how far the earth slipped in earthquakes hundreds of years ago.

Other people have done this before to estimate the size earthquake and level of slip on a resolution of hundreds of kilometres. My algorithm does it at a resolution of 20 km.

You can use a brute force approach to this... that is try hundreds of millions of different earthquakes until you find a set of events that fits the data but that takes about a couple of days.

I was able to design a genetic algorithm that treats the parameters describing an earthquake model as a set of genes. I made a load of these earthquake models at random and then 'bred' them to evolve a set of models that fit the data. I was able to use parallel programming techniques to squeeze out a result in about 15 mins.

*****

I got sent the manuscript proofs from the Journal of Geophysical Research on friday evening... it means my technique is now peer reviewed and due to be published in the next few weeks... which should make my thesis defence a bit easier

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Often time I was sitting around running mad experiments, pretentiously supping on a starbucks in

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a coffee shop

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fapuccino?

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straight up drip... too much frothing about with the aul fapuccino.

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Fuck me. That's impressive mate. We'll done. Really interesting stuff. What'd you study at degree level?

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I done environmental science... so it was a bit of a leap to geophysics... given i had no A-levels math or physics.lol.

but before that, about 10 years ago now, the highlight of my day was making sure Utah was well fed for lunch when I was working in Doorsteps

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Oh and cheers

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Aul pav 'good will hunting' lov. Post up whatever journal it gets published in. Wouldn't mind attempting to read it.

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yeah, RJ asked me to before but the review process took forever...and I wanted to wait til it was complete... make sure I hadn't fucked something up

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