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Cool science shit

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blogs.technet.com/b/ne... would love this as a coffee table

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www.msn.com/en-gb/heal...

Oxygen causes lung cancer (!?)

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oxygen causes all concer... one of the most toxic substances on the planet

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I had no idea the rain smell was an actual thing...

gizmodo.com/what-high-...

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or that fish sperm could be recycled to extract rare earth metals

gizmodo.com/recycling-...

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Fish jizz. Who knew?!

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imagine the collapse of civilisation was staved off by fish spunk...

gaia moves in mysterious ways

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When Lakes Explode

"On August 21st 1986, a giant gas cloud exploded from Cameroons Lake Nyos, containing 80 million cubic metres of carbon dioxide and creating a giant 25 metre wave. The gas cloud that escaped rapidly spread across the land, effectively wiping out everything within a 25 KM radius, including over 1700 people."

www.iflscience.com/env...

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Jesus! 80 million cubic meters. Absolute madness.

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Ancient looking... www.iflscience.com/pla...

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www.nisciencefestival.com

NI science festival looks good

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Yeah, it's great to see things like that. Younger generations need more science in their lives.

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This Is The Fish Researchers Found Living Underneath 2,400 Feet Of Ice

io9.com/this-is-the-fi...

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Laser-etched metal 'bounces' water

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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That's cool as fuck.

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Hopefully they start making bike components like that.

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Def, Jim. There serious potential if they can get it economically viable.

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There's a few lizards that are so hydrophobic that they can run on water and rain drops just bounce of em, need to breed em in their millions, skin em and make water proof lizard coats

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Ned to breed with them.....grow yer own.....floaty scrotey

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Finally watched that "History of Quantum Mechanics" Well, i got half way through the second. Makes me understand it much easier. Dont quite get the connection with Biology, and kind of think that scientists are going a bit buck mad with their theories. Cant explain it, use Quantum Theory. Im going to go out on a limb here, but you know Deja Vu. Quantum Mechanics.

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A system that enables you to feel and handle floating virtual objects with your bare hands is poised to bring virtual reality into the physical world...

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CYMATICS: Science Vs. Music - Nigel Stanford

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Half the DNA on the NYC Subway Matches No Known Organism

"The results of a massive new DNA sequencing project on the New York City subway have just been published. And yup, there's a lot of bacteria on the subway—though we know most of it is harmless. What's really important, though, is what we don't know about it."

gizmodo.com/half-the-d...

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Must give this a go sometime!

This Image Can Break Your Brain

We all might have seen some things during our time surfing the web, but have you ever heard of an image that can literally change the way your mind functions?

www.iflscience.com/bra...

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i2.wp.com/www.fromquar...

i2.wp.com/www.fromquar...

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Very interesting idea....

Dark matter can give you cancer — and that may be a good thing.
It may be possible to build a DNA-based detector to measure the “wind” of dark matter blowing through our planet.

"Dark matter particles thus can damage the bond structure of molecules inside your body. A few percent of the atomic nuclei in your body is DNA, so just by chance sometimes dark matter will damage your DNA. Most of the time this happens the damage will be repaired or the cell will die. But sometimes it won’t; sometimes, the damaged DNA can live on and reproduce."

medium.com/starts-with...

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Fascinating photos reveal how they built the SR-71 Blackbird

loid.gizmodo.com/fasci...

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This is really class.

"It looks like the sun... but it isn't. It's a brand new type of artificial skylight called CoeLux which, for the first time, recreates the scientific process that makes the sky appear blue. It also creates an illusion of depth to make the 'sun' appear to be far above. Lux takes an exclusive look."

luxreview.com/news/515...

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That blackbird article is fascinating. Great read.

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you should seek out the article about the Blackbird pilot flying over libya, its a great read

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Possible discovery in 2015 of a new particle in physics

m.phys.org/news/2015-0...

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If you ask me, they need to control the amount of particles getting into this country.

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A hard drive made from DNA preserved in glass could store vast amounts of data for over 2 million years

www.newscientist.com/a...

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Frequency
xkcd.com/1331

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motherboard.vice.com/r...

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Engineers in the UK have found that limpets' teeth consist of the strongest biological material ever tested.

Limpets use a tongue bristling with tiny teeth to scrape food off rocks and into their mouths, often swallowing particles of rock in the process.

The teeth are made of a mineral-protein composite, which the researchers tested in tiny fragments in the laboratory.

They found it was stronger than spider silk, as well as all but the very strongest of man-made materials.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/sci...

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Colima volcano in Mexico has been pretty active the last couple of months...

www.bbc.co.uk/news/wor...

more recently...

www.bbc.co.uk/news/wor...

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This is class, check out the tour... ory.maps.arcgis.com/ap...

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Potential HIV vaccine... www.sciencealert.com/p...

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This is awesome. Flying through a Hurricane Eye wall.

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This is pretty amazing. Happens so fast, but look how quick the bee's react in the slow motion reply. They're swarming towards the bird before it arrives... i.imgur.com/3hgP6bA.gifv

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in the belfast telegraph!
www.belfasttelegraph.c...

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taken from here...

www.quantamagazine.org...

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"New physics theory that could explain how life began 'has creationists terrified'"

thats the problem, no matter what evidence is presented religious fundamentalists simply cannot process it even in its most simplest form, you can never convince them otherwise, they are brainlocked into believing nonsense and only they themselves can undo it

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i didn't really care about the headline... just the fact the first place i heard about it was the telegraph

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Andrew Griffen is on the ball. Give that man a raise.

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I assumed you kept abreast of all science related news through the Newtownabbey gazette

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fucking Newtownabbey gazette, rj? how long have you lived? Newtownabbey times, man! a giant among broadsheets!!

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First full body transplant is two years away, surgeon claims

"A surgeon says full-body transplants could become a reality in just two years."

"He has claimed for years that medical science has advanced to the point that a full body transplant is plausible, but the proposal has caused raised eyebrows, horror and profound disbelief in other surgeons."

www.theguardian.com/so...

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Japanese researchers have developed a pair of time-keeping devices that are so accurate, they'll lose one second every 16 billion years, so, more than three times the age of the Earth, and 3 billion years older than the Universe itself.

Created by physicists led by Hidetoshi Katori from the Riken Research Institute, these 'cryogenic optical lattice clocks' are so accurate, they beat the caesium atomic clocks that are currently being used to define what a 'second' is. In fact, atomic clocks - which measure time based on how electrons in caesium atoms 'jump' at certain frequencies of radiation - tend to carry a one-second error every 30 million years.

What do these new clocks mean for us regular folks? Right now, our power grids, GPS technologies, and the clocks on our computers and smartphones are all synced up to how caesium atomic clocks are keeping time. While the clocks on our computers being a mere fraction of a second out over millions of years isn't exactly going to affect our lives, that tiny discrepancy can make things difficult when trying to pinpoint an exact location via GPS, and it can affect how accurate our measurements are when it comes to things like predicting earthquakes, says Nicole Arce at Tech Times.

www.sciencealert.com/t...

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The first ever photograph of light as both a particle and wave

"Light behaves both as a particle and as a wave. Since the days of Einstein, scientists have been trying to directly observe both of these aspects of light at the same time. Now, scientists at EPFL have succeeded in capturing the first-ever snapshot of this dual behavior."

Read more at: ys.org/news/2015-03-pa...

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