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Bitcoin/Litecoin etc

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Original thread gone?

Bitcoin back on the up today after a couple of days with very little movement.

Litecoin doing well still but down today a bit. It really needs gox to announce a date for thier trading engine to open, kinda in limbo at the mo it would seem

@leanne I havent looked into desktop/offline wallet software, is that something you are looking into?

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14

Gold still has physical worth, though. No matter what.

The rich keep their wealth through property, art, gold and silver. Bitcoin and all is nothing at the moment. Good prices on gold, for the moment.

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Only because of its rarity, surely?

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Sure that's gonna happen soon, takki! haha

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Nope, jewellery an all, sure. Just in cabling etc.

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Used in cabling*

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Everyone is pulling their gold back or buying more in. Not just the chinese.

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There are a number of companies planning to get the ball rolling in the asteroid mining research with the next couple of years. Obviously an actual haul is still a while off, but it will probably happen in our lifetimes.

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BITCOIN going to be that rare that I think it be the leading commodity, if you can even call it that. maybe stick them on strings wear round your neck.

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but what happens if the US Federal gov declare bitcoin a money laundering felony or the European Central Bank prevent the business world from accepting bitcoin in shops and it gets blocked?

that was copy and paste. lol

here is that other link... High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.comtarget="_blank">ftsales.support@ft.com> to buy additional rights. www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f74...

E-gold founder backs new Bitcoin rival

By Stephen Foley in New York

The founder of one of the earliest virtual currencies has re-emerged with a rival to Bitcoin, more than five years after his first venture, e-gold, was shut down by the US Department of Justice.

Douglas Jackson is consulting for a membership organisation called Coeptis that hopes to launch a new version of his gold-backed currency, which attracted millions of users at its height.

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.comtarget="_blank">ftsales.support@ft.com> to buy additional rights. www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f74...

The aim is to lure many of the people who have been attracted to Bitcoin and other virtual currencies this year, including businesses that are looking for a cheap way to process payments outside the traditional banking system.

Coeptis’s “global standard currency” would be fully backed by reserves of gold, held in a trust, in effect turning the precious metal into a medium of exchange.

Mr Jackson and two others pleaded guilty in July 2008 to running an illegal money transmitting business and to aiding money laundering, after federal investigators charged that “criminals of every stripe gravitated to e-gold as a place to move their money with impunity”.

Bill Cunningham, chief executive of CMO, the Florida company behind Coeptis, said the technology behind e-gold has been updated and expanded to ensure it complies with the emerging regulations covering virtual currencies. Unlike e-gold, it would verify members’ identities before allowing them to trade.

“We believe we will have better anti-money laundering procedures than any other virtual currency business and that we will compare well with the banking industry,” Mr Cunningham said.

“One of the advantages of seeing what happened to the e-gold system is we understand where we fell down before.”

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.comtarget="_blank">ftsales.support@ft.com> to buy additional rights. www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f74...

CMO is planning to buy its currency system from Mr Jackson, but because of his conviction, he will not have an operational role in the company.

For several years, Mr Jackson had hoped to resurrect e-gold himself, but it became clear he would not be able to obtain the money transmitter licences required in most US states.

Mr Cunningham said CMO had begun approaching state regulators about obtaining licences itself and hopes to launch before the middle of next year.

The membership organisation’s name comes from the phrase annuit coeptis, meaning “he has favoured our undertakings”, which appears on US banknotes.

The emergence of Bitcoin has sparked a wave of experimentation in currencies and in online payments. Regulators and monetary authorities have so far been content to allow such currencies, but have pressured exchanges and brokers to introduce the same money-laundering checks as traditional financial institutions.

A European Central Bank study last year concluded virtual currencies were too small to worry about yet, but their growth should be monitored lest they start to threaten financial stability.

bte i google searched "Coeptis currency" and clicked the link to the ft. doen a question, just done it again, answered a few multiple choice questions on a pop up on the page, and not i have a week or two unlimited access survey free, to the site. apparently. :/

:)

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Bitcoin has a long, long, long way to go before it will be anywhere near that. But i'mn glad i'm involved in litecoin.

What makes you think that, takki?

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Bit coin jewellery... def got potential!

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shit, didn't read that bit about not copy and paste. oops.

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There are a couple of companies planning to go to a couple of near earth asteroids within the next few years. They are thought to be a massive reserve of materials which are very rare on earth, as the earth has melted and boiled and churned up the material for billions of years. Asteroids still have all the raw material, untouched and unsoiled.

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With the rate we are churning out things like mobile phones that use rare earth materials, the asteroid thing might come quicker than we thought.

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anyone sold any yet?

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Now don't we just

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Aul Blurt gets the number of the beast.

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news.yahoo.com/gold-ru...

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a random comment in response to one from Pavlovs Dog a page or so back.....the govt does not only permit payment of taxes in sterling. You can also pay in art, antiquities and items of historical interest. So surely that is just trading something you own off against your tax bill. which in theory could then be extrapolated to include other non-monetary items of value...inc. virtual currency if the govt so wished?

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I'll put a bet on right now that we will not be mining asteroids in our lifetime. Nothing makes me think that we will from what i've seen achieved in space travel, so far, and that article says nothing of the sort. They are selling it.

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Nor that article.

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Yea all this is fun until you try to move them and they disappear- I'm fucking fuming

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Sorry couldn't help with the PM Leanne, no notion, one would hope the Chinese/Ukrainian mafia havn't hacked the b'jesus outta u.

Anyone with coin holdings should seriously beef up their internet security - I personally have built a wee brick hut for the PC and keep the ipad in a zip lock bag.

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Kev I'll take that bet - have you read much about the Japanese space elevator?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

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are you sure ceri?

i've never seen that anywhere

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though i'd be interested in reading about it if you have a link close to hand

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Yea well if that's the case I've lost about 3grand - and No one to complain to and no way of tracing it- BTC are fantastic fun except its a nightmare to withdraw and your money can just disappear and there's nothing u can do about it- FUCK THAT

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it was on the news last week.

I can't find the particular story I was reading.... but this one talks about it...seems ot have been introduced in 2011

www.artsprofessional.c...

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thats kind of like using charitable donations to offset you liabilities and reduce your bill... but when you go to settle up the UK gov. won't take dollars or bitcoins i'd imagine

maybe in theory you could offset your entire tax bill using pre-eminent cultural goods... but i don't think cryptocurrencies will fall into that bracket

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shit leanne... it that your entire holding wiped out?

@takki and kev... deep sea mining will be happening well before asteroid mining

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no they obvs don't fall into that bracket. BUT...if the govt can just decide to start accepting charitable donations of cultural items because they need them, in theory they could also introduce other programmes that allow you to offset your tax bill with other items that they decide they require.

all hypothetical, but possible.

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lol, ok Kev

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Na I just had a few BTC- I have a load of ltc that thankfully I didn't move, there might be an issue with the wallet I have emailed their support and I'm waiting for a response - so there might be a glimmer of hope there

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jesus, nightmare Leanne

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DB, that would not be a good bet. They say that it will take 38 years, at least, to build that.

Nightmare, leanne!

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were you just moving from wallet to wallet, leanne? or where you trying to sell them to someone?

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No I had them on an exchange wallet and wanted to move them to a private wallet - alas no luck as yet
Ou est le bit coins!!!

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No I had them on an exchange wallet and wanted to move them to a private wallet - alas no luck as yet
Ou est le bit coins!!!

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would like to think the site wil get that sorted for you. good luck with it. :/

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kev, JFK gave NASA 10 years to get to the moon on vastly inferior technology to what we have now (or what will be developed in the near future e.g. carbon nano-tubes, meta-materials, more powerful computers to aid design and developments etc etc). Going to the moon was a government funded project, just to see if they could do it. Asteroids have got the eye of government scientists, multi-billionaire entrepreneurs and multinational companies AND they have the potential to reap huge rewards if we were to explore them, of course they are on the cards. I have read loads on the potential of asteroids and the interest in getting to them. Sure, we've already sent a probe to one and crashed it into it to learn more. We have already sent a probe to a comet! Why do you think it's such a pipe dream? I didn't realise you also had a vast knowledge of space travel, space tech/science as well.

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Apparently there is more gold in a ton of mobile phones than there is in actual ore. Just putting that out there.

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What I said was that an actual haul is a while off, but that they will probably get to an asteroid and mine/sample it in our lifetimes. I didn't mean we'll have Armageddon movie style missions to mine away at asteroids lol. I'm saying the potential is there and the interest is there. I also have a little optimism for the future, and I also have good faith in science and the minds that *actually* know what they're talking about when it comes to these sorts of things.

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Over the next two decades NASA continued studies and technology development work that would facilitate the capture and exploration of asteroids. In 1992, NASA sponsored a “Near-Earth-Object Interception Workshop” in Los Alamos, New Mexico. At this workshop, those present discussed a “space-based fabrication of very large, microlayer solar sails for asteroid retrieval.” Also discussed was the idea that “such capabilities clearly depend on much expanded human operations in space.” More recently, the International Space Station, has allowed NASA and its international partners to both complete a great deal of research on how to live and work in space, and also to explore long-duration human space flight and its effects on astronauts.

Since the dawn of the new millennium, NASA has also sent several missions to explore asteroids. Multiple probes have completed flybys of asteroids on their way to other planets, and two missions have launched specifically to study asteroids. NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous)-Shoemaker became the first spacecraft to orbit and touch down on an asteroid when it reached the asteroid Eros in 2000 and descended to its surface in 2001, and in July 2011, the Dawn spacecraft became the first probe to enter orbit around an object in the main asteroid belt when it reached the asteroid Vesta. Having completed its investigation of Vesta, Dawn is now on its way to our solar system’s largest asteroid, Ceres.

www.nasa.gov/topics/hi...

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Bruce Willis and the simultaneous launch of two space shuttles are some of the first thoughts conjured by a mission to an asteroid. That was Hollywood's take on what such a mission would entail in the 1998 film "Armageddon."

In a departure from the science fiction film's crusade to save Earth from a wayward asteroid, NASA's ambitious plan is to develop the first-ever mission to identify, capture and relocate a 500-ton asteroid by 2025. The asteroid mission was a key highlight of President Barack Obama's proposed fiscal year 2014 $17.7 billion NASA budget, which NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden presented April 10

www.nasa.gov/centers/d...

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There are near-limitless numbers of asteroids and more being discovered every year. More than 1,500 are as easy to reach as the Moon and are in similar orbits as Earth. Asteroids are filled with precious resources, everything from water to platinum. Harnessing valuable minerals from a practically infinite source will provide stability on Earth, increase humanity’s prosperity, and help establish and maintain human presence in space.

Planetary Resources is bringing the natural resources of space within humanity’s economic sphere of influence, propelling our future into the 21st century and beyond. Water from asteroids will fuel the in-space economy, and rare metals will increase Earth’s GDP.

Planetary Resources’ mission is clear: apply commercial, innovative techniques to explore space. We will develop low-cost robotic spacecraft to explore the thousands of resource-rich asteroids within our reach. We will learn everything we can about them, then develop the most efficient capabilities to deliver these resources directly to both space-based and terrestrial customers. Asteroid mining may sound like fiction, but it’s just science.

www.planetaryresources...

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Four billionaires are backing a newly unveiled asteroid-mining venture, adding to an impressive list of ultra-rich people trying to reshape spaceflight and exploration in the 21st century.

Planetary Resources, Inc. — which on Tuesday (April 24) officially revealed its plans to extract water and metals from near-Earth asteroids — counts Larry Page, Eric Schmidt, Ross Perot Jr. and Charles Simonyi among its investors.

Each man is worth $1 billion or more, according to recent estimates by Forbes magazine, with Google execs Page and Schmidt having about $16.7 billion and $6.2 billion to their names, respectively. Filmmaker James Cameron, worth $700 million or so, is advising the project, which seeks to both turn a profit and spur the further exploration and exploitation of space.

www.space.com/15419-as...

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They currently have two planned spacecraft. The “Firefly”, constructed from low cost materials, will prospect for suitable asteroids to mine. The larger “Dragonfly” craft will then go and start collecting asteroid material. They appear to have numerous more ambitious concept sketches for future craft, but again they haven’t released many details yet.

As well as metal, both companies intend to harvest hydrogen and oxygen to effectively create orbital fuel stations for other spacecraft. Planetary Resources have the long term goal of being able to alter the orbital trajectories of asteroids, and return entire asteroids into lunar orbit for mining. Meanwhile, DSI’s plans involve a 3D printer, dubbed the “Microgravity Foundry”, which will be able to create high quality metal components in orbit. Between them, we could be looking at the beginnings of true orbital industry.

Asteroid mining (or something similar) is already likely to become a necessity at some point in the future, as human technology continues to use up Earth’s resources. Meanwhile, asteroids are plentiful and full of usable metals and other resources, meaning that any successful asteroid mining venture could stand to become very wealthy. Couple this with the fact that both orbital fuel depots and construction facilities could significantly reduce the difficulty inherent in solar system exploration. These companies are already doing their utmost to reduce the cost of space travel, and eventually the cost could be reduced even further.

The end result could be that harvesting resources from asteroids may not only boost the economy here on Earth, but could help drive human exploration of the solar system.

Reduced costs, orbital manufacturing, and availability of materials could facilitate colonization of other parts of the solar system, and the end of this century may even see outposts not unlike the ISS in other parts of the solar system. If these companies can prove themselves and be successful, it’s possible that others will follow. The end of this century may even see an ‘asteroid rush’ not dislike the gold rushes of the 19th century. Some people have already considered whether asteroid mining may ultimately pave the way for interstellar travel. But perhaps we’re getting ahead of ourselves here.

news.discovery.com/spa...

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Planetary Resources, Inc. is not your average startup: its mission is to investigate and eventually mine asteroids in space!

Last week, the company issued a somewhat cryptic announcement saying they “will overlay two critical sectors – space exploration and natural resources – to add trillions of dollars to the global GDP”. I predicted this meant they wanted to mine asteroids, and yes, I will toot my own horn: I was right. They’re holding a press conference Tuesday morning to officially announce they’re going asteroid hunting.

The company had a pretty fierce amount of credibility right off the bat, with several ex-NASA engineers, an astronaut, and planetary scientists involved, as well as the backing of not one but several billionaires, including a few from Google… not to mention James Cameron. The co-founders of Planetary Resources are Peter Diamandis — he created the highly-successful X-Prize Foundation, to give cash awards to incremental accomplishments that will help achieve technological breakthroughs, including those for space travel — and Eric Anderson, X-Prize board member and Chairman of the Board of the Space Spaceflight Federation.

These are very, very heavy hitters. Clearly, they’re not screwing around.

blogs.discovermagazine...

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2.bp.blogspot.com/-qSC...

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lol

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global3.memecdn.com/so...

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I sold a couple of ltc to a mate the other day. Havent sold any on bitbargain or local litecoins. Another mate is doing a test gbp withdrawal from bitstamp to see how that goes..

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So of all the cryptofergs available, litefergs and peerfergs are best next to bitfergs? What about novaferg or nameferg? Are all these currencies only linked by using cryptofergography algorithms? I'm sure there are some high tech scammers with pockets full of fergs out there.

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sterling effort as ever PAT... you should spell his name backroads for added effect

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top, top ferging

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