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Sinn Féin getting fairly shown up here regarding this welfare reform farce. Seems like they've been caught out spoofing to their electorate and the facts about it are stacking up against them. IMO, it looks like that they've cooked this up to try and win votes from the vulnerable people who would be interested in the welfare reform (that they claim to be looking out for) and they've been caught out. It was either a lie, or they just got the facts and finances completely wrong. Either way their excuses reek of

This is why folks need to protest vote and vote Alliance or Green. It's clear the DUP and Sinn Féin aren't capable of being realistic in running the place. The DUP and their backward views, then Sinn Féin and their blatant spoofing. I don't understand why people cant see through it all.

I don't think I need to go in to reasons why the DUP shouldn't get any votes, but their views on equality is reason enough, alone. Sinn Féin make these wondrous claims to win votes (it would seem by preying on the vulnerable, in this case, and people who actually have real issues and shouldn't be used as political ammunition)... then you've got the stories of SF being involved in IRA sex abuse.

People need to use their vote to show that we don't want this nonsense any more. Stop the tribal nonsense and use your vote to damage these two main parties. It's the only way things will change.

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That's not the Andy I know Baz, must have been in a bad mood over something else. Klopp losing another final perhaps.

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In other news, Jim Allister wrote to PSNI to complain to them about them taking part in PRIDE this weekend and encourage them not to. What a bigoted prick.

Wonder will TF get turned away from Hudson again this year.

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miss TF.

Jim McAllister is a cunt. comical loyalists latching onto this topic. very desperate these days. morphed into taigs with the moaning victim mentality ;)

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Theyll be having a civil rights march soon

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That prick Bryson too. The hypocrisy is unbelievable.

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nothing said across the state on the 11th/12th night either Jamie lol

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www.theguardian.com/uk...

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That 1920s railways vs today's railways just shows how HGVs (lorries) changed how produce was moved about. When HGVs became mainstream there was no need for having railways everywhere as it was FAR more economically and logistically viable for producers to use lorries instead of having to use trains. They could fill a lorry when they wanted, send it where they wanted and that was it. It costed far less. To go by rail, they needed something to take the produce to the station, wait for a suitable train to take it to the closest viable station to where it was to be delivered, maybe having to change trains etc. Then it had to get from the destination station to where ever after that. Lorries cut all that shite out and made it far cheaper. So the railways closed down, apart from on the main routes and routes which passengers would still use enough for it to be viable to run them.

Back around the turn of the century, when the railways were at their height, the main ways to move produce was horse and cart, canals and trains. Trains was obviously the quickest way, that's why there was so many lines at that time.

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They still use horse and cart out west.

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The thing about hgv is that they operate best on decent fast moving roads otherwise they become expensive as the price of fuel has risen dramatically over the years. Freight trains are more efficient, moving bigger loads for less fuel. The switch to roads and hgv across Ireland was very shortsighted IMO.

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that video.

'I'm Scottish' lol

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immigrant

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Having 100's miles of railway to look after and then trains to run on them all and get looked after also just isn't cost effective. That's why the entire world shifted to HGV, apart from on main routes or routes which have large scale industry which can viably make use of rail.

How has the switch to HGV in Ireland been short sighted? Do you not think if it was the cheapest and most logical way then it would still be mainstream?

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Rail only works with high volume movement (industry, produce, people, whatever) and/or over large distances. If the demand isn't there, then it's extremely expensive to operate. Especially when trains have to go at certain times, whether their cargo is maximised or not. Fuel costs apply to rail also. As does all the other huge overheads they have to cover (maintenance, lines, staff, upgrades, etc).

Also cars in the 20s where extremely rare and expensive. As the price and availability became more widespread over the years, why would people need to go out of their way to get to a station, then to some station in the rough area of their destination (which might be miles away, again), then have to get some other method of transport to their final destination when they could just jump in their car at their front door and go exactly where they wanted?

The more you think about it, the more that tweet intension is blown away.

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This would sort out a load of people if it was implemented www.politics.ie/forum/...

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There isn't a single line left in the NW of Ireland there in that map. The reasons are no doubt complex but what are you actually saying here?

To me you are saying it was natural that infrastructure fell away in places like Derry because it simply couldn't be justified due to its economic contribution to the public purse.

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I think some of the stuff I read on wesley Johnson site on road upgrades, motorway is about £30m per km to build. Rail I'm not sure what the costs per km to lay are. I believe they are possibly more expensive but you can carry more tonnage per mile on rail than road.

There's pros and cons for each choice but a combination of both probably is the best solution. Rail should run alongside road as they usually take the most efficient routes. This is the case in big European countries like Germany etc.

Here's Wesley's site: www.wesleyjohnston.com...

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That looks amazing cmk.

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Rail first should be the policy. But we are wedded to the car and the main city is now one of the most congested in Europe.

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Irish roads, gas mains, water mains and other utilities should all be nationalised. We pay extra for polarisation.

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RP, yes, the rail infrastructure fell away as it wasn't viable and transportation methods changed drastically when motor vehicles became more widespread. Surely it doesn't take much common sense to see that maintaining and funding lots of under utilised and expensive railways, when instead you could put the expenditure into road links which would be far better value for money and reflect the nature of the massively growing demand due to the increase in motor vehicle usage. The fact that's certain places didn't get the expenditure they could probably have done with goes back to my previous post, that the little we had for infrastructure was used mainly in the areas were it would give the maximum benefit and return.

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RP, why should rail be first?

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Full report here. It would have 85% of the population within 10km of a motorway www.ibec.ie/IBEC/Press...

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Will get a read through that. Has there been any more chat about it since?

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But the rub of the original article was that while your points no doubt provide some of the many reasons for the poor development of infrastructure in the NW it simply doesn't stand to reason that such a bias could exist without taking into account the political dominance of one community for a very long time and he continues to suggest that recent decision making could well be argued to be in step with that historical trend.

And because that is evident then it should be acknowledged and redressed. Man they were teaching the west of the Bann divide in my A Level economics class 17 years ago. This is not new.

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Rail should be first because mass motoring has been a weight around the country for a while now. Even recent articles about the love of Diesel cars in Northern Ireland despite the damage they cause, finally being acknowledged. More my opinion but I think it is crucial we have a decent rail network in the coming years with climate change taking hold.

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We should just go the whole hog and get a hyperloop built between derry and belfast.

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That's quite a last sentence RP. I don't think DUP even recognise global warming.

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Agree with rp on this. An electrified rail infrastructure running off renewable generated power would be the way to go. Cut out usage of fossil fuels for freight. Ireland really should be able to generate 100% of its power requirements from renewable sources. Wind, wave and less so solar.

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Hyperloop sounds shite. A technocommerce flytunnel is what's needed

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Isn't it the same for universities? I am to remember reading that they only built magee when they finally had to. Tried to make Coleraine do instead.

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Magee college was always in Derry historically but when the decision came in the 60s to build a new uni the second city was overlooked by the unionist government of the time for what was a small town in the only unionist majority constituency of county Derry. More recently Derry has missed out again when they decided to build a new uni in Belfast and move Jordanstown into the centre rather than invest in expanding magee. Means that Belfast now has the two main unis in the whole of NI with all the benefits that offers with student population and whatever else. While they promise to expand magee buying land but then saying they've no money to build when they find £450m for the Jordanstown move.

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Yeah, but why would you bother expanding Magee when it has shit road and rail links? Catch 22

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It's the chicken and egg scenario for sure. Broken promises and historical sectarianism have us where we are but the cycle needs broken but all people are producing are excuses.

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Andy, no point trying to articulate the benefits to Takki. He's happy with the protestant state for a protestant people agenda
Big DUPer

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Come on Muzak, don't be like that.

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Derry wasn't predominantly nationalist pre 1970's was pretty much 50/50 so to say it was a unionist agenda to deprive it isn't necessarily true. The population at the time wasn't very big and wasn't growing when you had Belfast having more population in the 40's-60's than they do now. Belfast was booming around that time and was obvious it would get most investment.

People forget Derry was a no go area in the 70's and 80's more so than Belfast so it didn't help things, You had a mass exodus of protestants leaving the city and west bank for the likes of Belfast and Bangor along with new suburbs getting build like waterside, drumahoe, eglinton and newbuildings. Allow there is no excuse now for it not to get its equal share but im sure there are other parts of NI that get nothing and derry has had a lot of public money since 2013.

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Universities are businesses these days. Businesses trying to attract international students paying a premium. Derry simply cannot compete with Belfast in terms of facilities, infrastructure etc etc. Belfast can barely compete with Dublin, so I'd imagine a decision these days is borne of market factors rather than any historical bias.

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Lol dufunk, Derry was a nationalist majority in the 60s and was gerrymandered to the hilt.

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Not sure how to feel about that.

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Could picture you wearing it while playing with your "hurley bat".

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Rangers will also be cherishing everyone equally by bringing out a top to celebrate black history.

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picked a fine specimen to model the new top

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How can you assume what the authors of the Proclamation would think about a recent ideology?

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I can take a stab at what they'd think about teacup taigs strolling along with their "hurley bats" tbf.

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Teacup taigs.

Please stop

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m.facebook.com/story.p...

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Wild Bore level comedy that.

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